Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194434
Title:
The Role of Regret Aversion in Decision Making
Author:
Reb, Jochen Matthias
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is concerned with the role of regret aversion in decision making. Specifically, it examines how regret aversion influences decision process, choice, and post-decisional behaviors and feelings. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the past empirical findings and theorizing on regret aversion. Chapter 2 examines whether regret aversion leads to a stronger or weaker preference for so-called reason-based choices (cf., Shafir, Simonson, & Tversky, 1993), or options that are more easily justifiable. Specifically, four experiments test whether four well-known reason-based choice effects are amplified or attenuated when regret is made salient. These effects are the asymmetric dominance effect, the compromise effect, the select/reject effect, and the most important attribute effect. Chapter 3 reports on five experiments that examine whether regret aversion leads decision makers to engage in more careful decision processing as suggested by Janis and Mann (1977). It extends the study of regret aversion from choice behavior to decision processing. Chapter 4 studies the effects of regret aversion in repeated decisions. Specifically, it examines experimentally how decision makers handle the trade off between seeking feedback on foregone options that may facilitate learning and better decision making in future decisions, and avoiding feedback on foregone options as such feedback may cause feelings of regret. Chapter 5 summarizes the contributions of this dissertation and concludes.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Anticipated Regret; Choice; Decision Making; Decision Process; Regret Aversion
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Management; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Connolly, Terence
Committee Chair:
Connolly, Terence

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Regret Aversion in Decision Makingen_US
dc.creatorReb, Jochen Matthiasen_US
dc.contributor.authorReb, Jochen Matthiasen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is concerned with the role of regret aversion in decision making. Specifically, it examines how regret aversion influences decision process, choice, and post-decisional behaviors and feelings. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the past empirical findings and theorizing on regret aversion. Chapter 2 examines whether regret aversion leads to a stronger or weaker preference for so-called reason-based choices (cf., Shafir, Simonson, & Tversky, 1993), or options that are more easily justifiable. Specifically, four experiments test whether four well-known reason-based choice effects are amplified or attenuated when regret is made salient. These effects are the asymmetric dominance effect, the compromise effect, the select/reject effect, and the most important attribute effect. Chapter 3 reports on five experiments that examine whether regret aversion leads decision makers to engage in more careful decision processing as suggested by Janis and Mann (1977). It extends the study of regret aversion from choice behavior to decision processing. Chapter 4 studies the effects of regret aversion in repeated decisions. Specifically, it examines experimentally how decision makers handle the trade off between seeking feedback on foregone options that may facilitate learning and better decision making in future decisions, and avoiding feedback on foregone options as such feedback may cause feelings of regret. Chapter 5 summarizes the contributions of this dissertation and concludes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAnticipated Regreten_US
dc.subjectChoiceen_US
dc.subjectDecision Makingen_US
dc.subjectDecision Processen_US
dc.subjectRegret Aversionen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorConnolly, Terenceen_US
dc.contributor.chairConnolly, Terenceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrdonez, Lisa D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPiattelli-Palmarini, Massimoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1070en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137353806en_US
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