Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194423
Title:
Imagery Use in Synchronized Swimming
Author:
Ranucci, Jill
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the utilization of imagery and the impact of imagery use on collegiate synchronized swimmers. Swimmers (N=165) completed The Sport Imagery Questionnaire (Hall et al. 2005), reporting their frequency of imaging. Interviews were conducted (N=11) to further ascertain why and when synchronized swimmers use imagery and mechanisms they employ for more effective imaging experiences. Exploratory factor analyses indicated three of Hall et al's (2005) five subscales showed significant differences between skill level groups. Specifically, motivational specific functions of imagery data showed significant differences between elite swimmers and the other three groups (advanced, intermediate, and novice). Cognitive specific and motivational general-mastery functions of imagery data indicated significant differences between elite and novice swimmers, suggesting that novice swimmers are less likely to use these subscales of imagery compared to elite swimmers. Qualitative data provided evidence of elite swimmers having more sophisticated and developed applications of imaging skills. The results suggest the global implications of this study and how imagery improves synchronized swimming training programs. Key findings include: Each progressive skill level had better imaging skills and utilization than the lower levels Years experience, repetition, and training impact synchronized swimmers use of imagery The very nature of certain common synchronized swimming drills such as "think-throughs and land drill" elicit imaging training The sport of synchronized swimming is an excellent instrument to research imaging training techniques.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Imagery; Synchronized Swimming; teaching tools; coaching strategies; teaching strategies
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching & Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Vinson, Kevin
Committee Chair:
Vinson, Kevin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleImagery Use in Synchronized Swimmingen_US
dc.creatorRanucci, Jillen_US
dc.contributor.authorRanucci, Jillen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the utilization of imagery and the impact of imagery use on collegiate synchronized swimmers. Swimmers (N=165) completed The Sport Imagery Questionnaire (Hall et al. 2005), reporting their frequency of imaging. Interviews were conducted (N=11) to further ascertain why and when synchronized swimmers use imagery and mechanisms they employ for more effective imaging experiences. Exploratory factor analyses indicated three of Hall et al's (2005) five subscales showed significant differences between skill level groups. Specifically, motivational specific functions of imagery data showed significant differences between elite swimmers and the other three groups (advanced, intermediate, and novice). Cognitive specific and motivational general-mastery functions of imagery data indicated significant differences between elite and novice swimmers, suggesting that novice swimmers are less likely to use these subscales of imagery compared to elite swimmers. Qualitative data provided evidence of elite swimmers having more sophisticated and developed applications of imaging skills. The results suggest the global implications of this study and how imagery improves synchronized swimming training programs. Key findings include: Each progressive skill level had better imaging skills and utilization than the lower levels Years experience, repetition, and training impact synchronized swimmers use of imagery The very nature of certain common synchronized swimming drills such as "think-throughs and land drill" elicit imaging training The sport of synchronized swimming is an excellent instrument to research imaging training techniques.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectImageryen_US
dc.subjectSynchronized Swimmingen_US
dc.subjectteaching toolsen_US
dc.subjectcoaching strategiesen_US
dc.subjectteaching strategiesen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching & Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVinson, Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.chairVinson, Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVinson, Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRomano, Mollyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2127en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747235en_US
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