Latina Presidents of Four-year Institutions, Penetrating the Adobe Ceiling: A Critical View

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194416
Title:
Latina Presidents of Four-year Institutions, Penetrating the Adobe Ceiling: A Critical View
Author:
Ramos, Sofia Martinez
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In 2007, the nation's Latino population was estimated at 45.5 million, or 15.1% of the 301.6 million total U.S. population. Latinos are the fastest-growing minority group, exceeding 500,000 in 16 states and representing the largest minority group in 20 states (Bernstein, 2008). The number of Latinos is projected to almost triple by 2050 and will represent about 60 percent of the country's growth with about 128 million Latinos, making up 29% of the total projected 440 million U.S. population (Passel, 2008).Latino's continued population growth makes their educational and occupational success, and their ability to self-sustain and to contribute to the greater good, essential to this nation's economy. Since education is the most critical component in the productivity and self-sufficiency of Latinos, it is important that their representation at all levels of education, including students, faculty and administrators increase along with the population growth. However, Latino representation in higher education has not grown proportionately to their increases in the U.S. population (Haro, 2003). Their representation and voice is lacking in the decision-making, top levels of administration, such as vice presidents, provosts, presidents, and chancellors.The under-representation of Latinas in higher education was the impetus for this study, to identify elements affecting their trajectory to the top ranks of administration, including embedded structures, institutionalized filters, and elements within the social selection process that affect their representation in the presidency and other top-level administrative posts of four-year institutions.Their narratives document Latinas' challenges and successes and validate the importance of culture and identity, and the fact that dual culturalism is a source of strength and not a deficit. This study acknowledges bias in higher education and the need to incorporate mentors, champions and other strategic measures to increase Latino representation in graduate programs, faculty and administration. These Latinas' ability to penetrate the adobe ceiling serves as a model and a "counterstory" for others who aspire to top administrative positions. Their insights and recommendations provide a valuable context to inform practice and research.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Academic Capitalism; Adobe cieling -Latinas in Higher Education; Biculturalism/dual culturalism; Latina administrators in Higher Education; Latina Presidents 4-year institutions
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Rhoades, Gary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLatina Presidents of Four-year Institutions, Penetrating the Adobe Ceiling: A Critical Viewen_US
dc.creatorRamos, Sofia Martinezen_US
dc.contributor.authorRamos, Sofia Martinezen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2007, the nation's Latino population was estimated at 45.5 million, or 15.1% of the 301.6 million total U.S. population. Latinos are the fastest-growing minority group, exceeding 500,000 in 16 states and representing the largest minority group in 20 states (Bernstein, 2008). The number of Latinos is projected to almost triple by 2050 and will represent about 60 percent of the country's growth with about 128 million Latinos, making up 29% of the total projected 440 million U.S. population (Passel, 2008).Latino's continued population growth makes their educational and occupational success, and their ability to self-sustain and to contribute to the greater good, essential to this nation's economy. Since education is the most critical component in the productivity and self-sufficiency of Latinos, it is important that their representation at all levels of education, including students, faculty and administrators increase along with the population growth. However, Latino representation in higher education has not grown proportionately to their increases in the U.S. population (Haro, 2003). Their representation and voice is lacking in the decision-making, top levels of administration, such as vice presidents, provosts, presidents, and chancellors.The under-representation of Latinas in higher education was the impetus for this study, to identify elements affecting their trajectory to the top ranks of administration, including embedded structures, institutionalized filters, and elements within the social selection process that affect their representation in the presidency and other top-level administrative posts of four-year institutions.Their narratives document Latinas' challenges and successes and validate the importance of culture and identity, and the fact that dual culturalism is a source of strength and not a deficit. This study acknowledges bias in higher education and the need to incorporate mentors, champions and other strategic measures to increase Latino representation in graduate programs, faculty and administration. These Latinas' ability to penetrate the adobe ceiling serves as a model and a "counterstory" for others who aspire to top administrative positions. Their insights and recommendations provide a valuable context to inform practice and research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAcademic Capitalismen_US
dc.subjectAdobe cieling -Latinas in Higher Educationen_US
dc.subjectBiculturalism/dual culturalismen_US
dc.subjectLatina administrators in Higher Educationen_US
dc.subjectLatina Presidents 4-year institutionsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFernandez, Celestinoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10209en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750807en_US
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