Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194408
Title:
Performing Costa Rica: "El Tico" and National Identity
Author:
Berigan, Yadira Cordoba
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Costa Rica is a small country located in Central America, characterized by having one of the most stable democracies in Latin America. Costa Rica was the first country in the world to officially abolish its armed forces (1949), following the Civil War in 1948. From the time of its foundation as a Republic, Costa Rica has been defined in terms of homogeneity and socio-economic equality. These two features have been recognized as the main elements of the country's national identity, and the reason for Costa Ricans to be perceived as peaceful and happy individuals. This research utilizes the methodological lens of Performance Studies to analyze these iconic elements of Costa Rican national identity and to challenge the view of Costa Rica as a paradise. Even though the international community continues defining this country in the same manner in which it was defined during the second part of the nineteen century, the reality is that during the last three decades this nation has changed so much that the same definition is not adequate anymore. Street violence in the country has become a threat to citizens of all socio-economic classes, taking away their peace and happiness. I analyze this development and the response by the citizens in an attempt to show that Costa Rica is facing an internal conflict that could have devastating on its society. Many social movements have formed during the last decade to try to bring Costa Rica back to the nation it was at the beginning of the twentieth century. The most important characteristic of these movements is that they try to unmask the country showing that it is not peaceful in an attempt to recover the peace they believed characterized the Costa Rica of their ancestors.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Costa Rica; Happy citizens; National Identity; Peaceful Citizens; Street violence; Utopia or dystopia
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Spanish; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gutierrez, Laura
Committee Chair:
Gutierrez, Laura

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePerforming Costa Rica: "El Tico" and National Identityen_US
dc.creatorBerigan, Yadira Cordobaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerigan, Yadira Cordobaen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCosta Rica is a small country located in Central America, characterized by having one of the most stable democracies in Latin America. Costa Rica was the first country in the world to officially abolish its armed forces (1949), following the Civil War in 1948. From the time of its foundation as a Republic, Costa Rica has been defined in terms of homogeneity and socio-economic equality. These two features have been recognized as the main elements of the country's national identity, and the reason for Costa Ricans to be perceived as peaceful and happy individuals. This research utilizes the methodological lens of Performance Studies to analyze these iconic elements of Costa Rican national identity and to challenge the view of Costa Rica as a paradise. Even though the international community continues defining this country in the same manner in which it was defined during the second part of the nineteen century, the reality is that during the last three decades this nation has changed so much that the same definition is not adequate anymore. Street violence in the country has become a threat to citizens of all socio-economic classes, taking away their peace and happiness. I analyze this development and the response by the citizens in an attempt to show that Costa Rica is facing an internal conflict that could have devastating on its society. Many social movements have formed during the last decade to try to bring Costa Rica back to the nation it was at the beginning of the twentieth century. The most important characteristic of these movements is that they try to unmask the country showing that it is not peaceful in an attempt to recover the peace they believed characterized the Costa Rica of their ancestors.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCosta Ricaen_US
dc.subjectHappy citizensen_US
dc.subjectNational Identityen_US
dc.subjectPeaceful Citizensen_US
dc.subjectStreet violenceen_US
dc.subjectUtopia or dystopiaen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGutierrez, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.chairGutierrez, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChuffe, Eliuden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhiteford, Scotten_US
dc.identifier.proquest10875en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753794en_US
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