Latino Families and Parental Involvement: A Case Study of Home Literature Conversations in a Primary Bilingual Classroom

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194392
Title:
Latino Families and Parental Involvement: A Case Study of Home Literature Conversations in a Primary Bilingual Classroom
Author:
Quinones, Anna Maria
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation study describes and interprets the dialogue between Latino parents and their children during home literature conversations. The participating students were enrolled in my first and second grade classroom in East Los Angeles, California. I was guided by the following research questions in this qualitative teacher research study: a) What is the nature of the home literature discussions, specifically what types of talk do parents and children use to think about the books they read together? and b) What are parents' perspectives on their involvement with the school and with their child's literacy development? Data sources connected to the children's dialogue at home and parent perspectives included audiotapes, transcripts, response journals, interviews, teaching journal and field notes. All families participated in home literature conversations and five families consistently audiotaped their conversations at home.The findings from this research demonstrate that Latino parents use a variety of strategies to sustain and expand the reading process of their children. The structure and routine each family set for themselves supported and encouraged their child to relate their personal experience, world experience, and other text experiences to extend meaning. Their talk supported comprehension for the different genres they selected providing opportunities for their children to grow in confidence, become articulate, and be able to engage in rich conversation about books. Additionally, this study revealed that Latino parents' definition of parental involvement differed from those suggested by the school.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading & Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Short, Kathy G.
Committee Chair:
Short, Kathy G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLatino Families and Parental Involvement: A Case Study of Home Literature Conversations in a Primary Bilingual Classroomen_US
dc.creatorQuinones, Anna Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorQuinones, Anna Mariaen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation study describes and interprets the dialogue between Latino parents and their children during home literature conversations. The participating students were enrolled in my first and second grade classroom in East Los Angeles, California. I was guided by the following research questions in this qualitative teacher research study: a) What is the nature of the home literature discussions, specifically what types of talk do parents and children use to think about the books they read together? and b) What are parents' perspectives on their involvement with the school and with their child's literacy development? Data sources connected to the children's dialogue at home and parent perspectives included audiotapes, transcripts, response journals, interviews, teaching journal and field notes. All families participated in home literature conversations and five families consistently audiotaped their conversations at home.The findings from this research demonstrate that Latino parents use a variety of strategies to sustain and expand the reading process of their children. The structure and routine each family set for themselves supported and encouraged their child to relate their personal experience, world experience, and other text experiences to extend meaning. Their talk supported comprehension for the different genres they selected providing opportunities for their children to grow in confidence, become articulate, and be able to engage in rich conversation about books. Additionally, this study revealed that Latino parents' definition of parental involvement differed from those suggested by the school.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.contributor.chairShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilmore, Perryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGriego-Jones, Tonien_US
dc.identifier.proquest10694en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753466en_US
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