Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194373
Title:
Scaling the Diversity of Botanical Form and Function
Author:
Price, Charles Anthony
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recent theoretical and empirical advances, in particular the fractal branching model of West, Brown and Enquist (WBE model), have highlighted the importance of exchange surfaces in understanding the integration of whole plant form, and functional traits. Key insights have arisen from an increased understanding of how the properties of distributive vessel networks influence whole plant metabolic and physiological traits. Here I show that an extension of WBE model, one in which network geometry is continuously variable, provides a robust foundation to understand the diversity of scaling relationships in plants and the organs of which they are composed. Central to the original WBE model has been the assumption of energy minimization as a selective force shaping the evolution of internal and external plant surface areas and morphology. Here I demonstrate how additional selection on traits not detailed in the original WBE formulation can lead to departures from strict energy minimization, and can thus explain much of the variation and covariation in observed scaling central tendencies in plant gross morphology observed within, and across natural plant communities. I test the predictions from this model extension with data from both regional and global datasets, from the leaf to whole plant level, across herbaceous, succulent, woody, annual and perennial taxa. These data demonstrate that the model extension is quite robust and should serve as a foundation upon which more detailed future models can be constructed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
allometry; plant; scaling; fractal
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Enquist, Brian J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleScaling the Diversity of Botanical Form and Functionen_US
dc.creatorPrice, Charles Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Charles Anthonyen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent theoretical and empirical advances, in particular the fractal branching model of West, Brown and Enquist (WBE model), have highlighted the importance of exchange surfaces in understanding the integration of whole plant form, and functional traits. Key insights have arisen from an increased understanding of how the properties of distributive vessel networks influence whole plant metabolic and physiological traits. Here I show that an extension of WBE model, one in which network geometry is continuously variable, provides a robust foundation to understand the diversity of scaling relationships in plants and the organs of which they are composed. Central to the original WBE model has been the assumption of energy minimization as a selective force shaping the evolution of internal and external plant surface areas and morphology. Here I demonstrate how additional selection on traits not detailed in the original WBE formulation can lead to departures from strict energy minimization, and can thus explain much of the variation and covariation in observed scaling central tendencies in plant gross morphology observed within, and across natural plant communities. I test the predictions from this model extension with data from both regional and global datasets, from the leaf to whole plant level, across herbaceous, succulent, woody, annual and perennial taxa. These data demonstrate that the model extension is quite robust and should serve as a foundation upon which more detailed future models can be constructed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectallometryen_US
dc.subjectplanten_US
dc.subjectscalingen_US
dc.subjectfractalen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairEnquist, Brian J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnquist, Brian J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosenzweig, Mikeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSwetman, Tomen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBetancourt, Julioen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHuxman, Travisen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1903en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746468en_US
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