Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194366
Title:
Rainfall Variability and Carbon Cycling in Semi-Arid Ecosystems
Author:
Potts, Daniel Lawrence
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Shifting patterns of precipitation associated with climate change may affect water-limited ecosystems to a greater degree than atmospheric CO2 or temperature changes, yet we lack a mechanistic understanding of the effects of water in these ecosystems. In water-limited ecosystems, annual net primary productivity correlates strongly with total annual precipitation. However, precipitation in these ecosystems arrives in episodic events, suggesting that biophysical investigations should focus on the implications of discrete precipitation events. Further, examining dynamics of ecosystem processes over a period of days or weeks promises to link our leaf-level mechanistic understandings with larger scale patterns and temporal dynamics of ecosystem photosynthetic CO2 uptake, respiration and evapotranspiration.The objectives of this dissertation were to quantify: (1) the influence of biotic and abiotic features of an ecosystem (e.g., species composition and soil physical characteristics) on short-term patterns of resilience and resistance to a precipitation pulse; (2) the role of antecedent climatic conditions and the seasonal timing of rainfall in limiting ecosystem carbon exchange in response to precipitation events; and (3) the effect of changes in woody plant abundance on seasonal ecosystem carbon dynamics in relation to the North American Monsoon.Major findings and contributions of this research include defining the concepts of ecosystem functional resistance and resilience and their implications in the presence of a dominant nonnative bunchgrass in semi-arid grasslands (Appendix A); a better understanding of the influence of warm-season precipitation variability and the seasonal timing of rainfall on ecosystem carbon dynamics in a semi-arid grassland (Appendix B); the use of flux duration analysis, a novel approach to analyzing ecosystem carbon and water flux time-series data to distinguish between "pulse-driven" or "steady-state" ecosystems (Appendix C); and, finally, the application of flux duration analysis to quantify the sensitivity of ecosystem carbon exchange in response to seasonal rainfall in a riparian grassland and shrubland and the role that plant functional type diversity may play in constraining carbon exchange sensitivity (Appendix D).
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Santa Rita Experimental Range; San Pedro River; mesquite; invasive species; precipitation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Huxman, Travis E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRainfall Variability and Carbon Cycling in Semi-Arid Ecosystemsen_US
dc.creatorPotts, Daniel Lawrenceen_US
dc.contributor.authorPotts, Daniel Lawrenceen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractShifting patterns of precipitation associated with climate change may affect water-limited ecosystems to a greater degree than atmospheric CO2 or temperature changes, yet we lack a mechanistic understanding of the effects of water in these ecosystems. In water-limited ecosystems, annual net primary productivity correlates strongly with total annual precipitation. However, precipitation in these ecosystems arrives in episodic events, suggesting that biophysical investigations should focus on the implications of discrete precipitation events. Further, examining dynamics of ecosystem processes over a period of days or weeks promises to link our leaf-level mechanistic understandings with larger scale patterns and temporal dynamics of ecosystem photosynthetic CO2 uptake, respiration and evapotranspiration.The objectives of this dissertation were to quantify: (1) the influence of biotic and abiotic features of an ecosystem (e.g., species composition and soil physical characteristics) on short-term patterns of resilience and resistance to a precipitation pulse; (2) the role of antecedent climatic conditions and the seasonal timing of rainfall in limiting ecosystem carbon exchange in response to precipitation events; and (3) the effect of changes in woody plant abundance on seasonal ecosystem carbon dynamics in relation to the North American Monsoon.Major findings and contributions of this research include defining the concepts of ecosystem functional resistance and resilience and their implications in the presence of a dominant nonnative bunchgrass in semi-arid grasslands (Appendix A); a better understanding of the influence of warm-season precipitation variability and the seasonal timing of rainfall on ecosystem carbon dynamics in a semi-arid grassland (Appendix B); the use of flux duration analysis, a novel approach to analyzing ecosystem carbon and water flux time-series data to distinguish between "pulse-driven" or "steady-state" ecosystems (Appendix C); and, finally, the application of flux duration analysis to quantify the sensitivity of ecosystem carbon exchange in response to seasonal rainfall in a riparian grassland and shrubland and the role that plant functional type diversity may play in constraining carbon exchange sensitivity (Appendix D).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSanta Rita Experimental Rangeen_US
dc.subjectSan Pedro Riveren_US
dc.subjectmesquiteen_US
dc.subjectinvasive speciesen_US
dc.subjectprecipitationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHuxman, Travis E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcPherson, Guy R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShuttleworth, W. Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArcher, Steven R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1338en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355107en_US
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