Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194351
Title:
Spherical Aberration Gauge for the Human Visual System
Author:
Pixton, Bruce
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Spherical aberration limits the ability of a human eye to form a clear image. The amount of Spherical Aberration found in a given eye is different across a population and is actively changing as a function of accommodation, light level, and age. Any attempt made to correct spherical aberration will need to have an accurate understanding of what the appropriate correction should be. Objective measurement of the Spherical Aberration inherent to the eye's optical systems helps to answer part of the question, but there are other factors in the human visual system, such as processing in the brain that affect what is "seen". Hence, a vision correction approach based purely on objective measurement of the eye's aberrations may not necessarily correspond to better vision. The Spherical Aberration Gauge has been developed to allow subjects to deter- mine for themselves the appropriate amount of correction required. The Gauge is designed to allow users to view an eye chart or scene while adjusting the amount of spherical aberration being introduced. It produces a wide range of spherical aberration levels from which a user can determine a single level that provides best vision. The amount selected by the user is considered a subjective spherical aberration correction and can then be applied to standard vision correction devices or procedures. This project attempts to bridge the gap between what is known about ocular spherical aberration and how the brain interprets the correction. The outcome of this project is to provide a tool that identifies the preferred amounts of spherical aberration correction and that gives insight from subjective feedback on the visual benefit thereof.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
spherical aberration; vision
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Greivenkamp, John E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSpherical Aberration Gauge for the Human Visual Systemen_US
dc.creatorPixton, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.authorPixton, Bruceen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSpherical aberration limits the ability of a human eye to form a clear image. The amount of Spherical Aberration found in a given eye is different across a population and is actively changing as a function of accommodation, light level, and age. Any attempt made to correct spherical aberration will need to have an accurate understanding of what the appropriate correction should be. Objective measurement of the Spherical Aberration inherent to the eye's optical systems helps to answer part of the question, but there are other factors in the human visual system, such as processing in the brain that affect what is "seen". Hence, a vision correction approach based purely on objective measurement of the eye's aberrations may not necessarily correspond to better vision. The Spherical Aberration Gauge has been developed to allow subjects to deter- mine for themselves the appropriate amount of correction required. The Gauge is designed to allow users to view an eye chart or scene while adjusting the amount of spherical aberration being introduced. It produces a wide range of spherical aberration levels from which a user can determine a single level that provides best vision. The amount selected by the user is considered a subjective spherical aberration correction and can then be applied to standard vision correction devices or procedures. This project attempts to bridge the gap between what is known about ocular spherical aberration and how the brain interprets the correction. The outcome of this project is to provide a tool that identifies the preferred amounts of spherical aberration correction and that gives insight from subjective feedback on the visual benefit thereof.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectspherical aberrationen_US
dc.subjectvisionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGreivenkamp, John E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreivenkamp, John E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSasian, Joséen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwiegerling, Jimen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10545en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752281en_US
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