A TRANSLOG COST FUNCTION ANALYSIS OF INPUT SUBSTITUTION IN THE U.S. COPPER SMELTING INDUSTRY 1960 - 1991

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194349
Title:
A TRANSLOG COST FUNCTION ANALYSIS OF INPUT SUBSTITUTION IN THE U.S. COPPER SMELTING INDUSTRY 1960 - 1991
Author:
Pitts, Morris Michael
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The copper smelting industry has under gone extreme change over the past three decades. These changes have reordered dramatically the demand for inputs and the way in which those inputs have been utilized. The stimulus for change has come from multiple sources, and chief among these stimuli has been the mandate to sharply curtail the atmospheric release of sulfur dioxide. Even though the total emissions were lower than those from steam generation of electricity and from the refinery and petro-chemical industry, the perceived local and regional impact of sulfur dioxide forced extreme changes in the utilization of fundamental inputs of capital, labor, energy and materials.This study attempts to analyze these input use changes by modeling the industry as a translog cost function and by generating a number of associated elasticities. In addition to the four basic inputs, the model includes as control variables output, and other variables that represent pollution abatement and technical change.The challenge of estimating a large model on a limited number of observations has delivered information that is more limited in scope than was originally desired. The proxy for technical change did not produce significant parameters and the pollution abatement proxy is limited in its participation in the results. The range of elasticities computed reveal a picture of an industry characterized by inelasticity, in general, labor and energy being part of the exceptions. The industry is found to be sensitive to output level in its degree of elasticity among inputs.The translog model is found to be an effective tool for industry analysis. The promise of detailed analytical information may be even greater at the firm level where data are more accurate and the number of observations far greater.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
translog cost function; elasticities; production function; copper smelting
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Mining Geological & Geophysical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Harris, DeVerle

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA TRANSLOG COST FUNCTION ANALYSIS OF INPUT SUBSTITUTION IN THE U.S. COPPER SMELTING INDUSTRY 1960 - 1991en_US
dc.creatorPitts, Morris Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorPitts, Morris Michaelen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe copper smelting industry has under gone extreme change over the past three decades. These changes have reordered dramatically the demand for inputs and the way in which those inputs have been utilized. The stimulus for change has come from multiple sources, and chief among these stimuli has been the mandate to sharply curtail the atmospheric release of sulfur dioxide. Even though the total emissions were lower than those from steam generation of electricity and from the refinery and petro-chemical industry, the perceived local and regional impact of sulfur dioxide forced extreme changes in the utilization of fundamental inputs of capital, labor, energy and materials.This study attempts to analyze these input use changes by modeling the industry as a translog cost function and by generating a number of associated elasticities. In addition to the four basic inputs, the model includes as control variables output, and other variables that represent pollution abatement and technical change.The challenge of estimating a large model on a limited number of observations has delivered information that is more limited in scope than was originally desired. The proxy for technical change did not produce significant parameters and the pollution abatement proxy is limited in its participation in the results. The range of elasticities computed reveal a picture of an industry characterized by inelasticity, in general, labor and energy being part of the exceptions. The industry is found to be sensitive to output level in its degree of elasticity among inputs.The translog model is found to be an effective tool for industry analysis. The promise of detailed analytical information may be even greater at the firm level where data are more accurate and the number of observations far greater.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjecttranslog cost functionen_US
dc.subjectelasticitiesen_US
dc.subjectproduction functionen_US
dc.subjectcopper smeltingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining Geological & Geophysical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHarris, DeVerleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRieber, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNewcomb, Richard T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAradhyula, Satheesh V.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPoulton, Mary M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavenport, William G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1150en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354204en_US
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