Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194347
Title:
Poverty, Fishing and Livelihoods on Lake Kossou, Cote d'Ivoire
Author:
Pittaluga, Fabio
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Poverty analysis in fisheries is dominated by assumptions of a linear relationship between fishing, income and poverty. Poverty is seen as a function of income, and income as a function of fish catch. Thus, the analytical frameworks to understand poverty in fisheries, and the policies enacted to reduce it, have focused on issues of overexploitation, regulatory mechanisms to maximize rent extraction, and technological innovation to improve fisheries’ productivity. This set of relations is underpinned by the assumption that improving fish catch per se would reduce fishers’ poverty. The study of fishing livelihoods on Lake Kossou in Côte d’Ivoire problematizes some of these assumptions. I revisit the “essentialization” of fishers with fish by utilizing the Sustainable Livelihood Approach as a lens of analysis, and by demonstrating that fishers’ livelihoods are based on a diversified portfolio of activities that span multiple sectors. Looking at livelihoods also questions the validity of the conventional “sites” of poverty analysis in fisheries (i.e. the boat, the landing site) and how these lead to misrepresentations of fishers’ livelihoods by emphasizing the upstream elements (catches) to the detriment of downstream activities in the value chain (processing and trading) that are crucial in the realization of fishers’ sustainable livelihoods. Looking at the complexity of fishers’ livelihoods sheds light on the relations between poverty (as an outcome variable) and vulnerability as a constant condition that is linked to access to multiple types of assets, the institutional contexts in which they operate, and the ways in which access to natural resources is constantly re-negotiated. To that effect, this study shows how access to Lake Kossou took a completely new meaning when the coffee-cocoa economy collapsed and young Ivorians saw it as an opportunity being stolen from them by Malian fishers. The context of post-colonial national identity formation (epitomized in the search for “Ivoirité”) served as political justification for claiming new rights to natural resources that had been relatively unimportant until then in economic terms. Finally, this study provides an innovative approach to poverty analysis by emphasizing its multiple dimensions, and by utilizing the statistical fuzzy sets methodology to construct multidimensional poverty indices.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
poverty; fisheries; livelihoods; Lake Kossou; Cote d'Ivoire; fuzzy sets
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stoffle, Richard W.
Committee Chair:
Stoffle, Richard W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePoverty, Fishing and Livelihoods on Lake Kossou, Cote d'Ivoireen_US
dc.creatorPittaluga, Fabioen_US
dc.contributor.authorPittaluga, Fabioen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPoverty analysis in fisheries is dominated by assumptions of a linear relationship between fishing, income and poverty. Poverty is seen as a function of income, and income as a function of fish catch. Thus, the analytical frameworks to understand poverty in fisheries, and the policies enacted to reduce it, have focused on issues of overexploitation, regulatory mechanisms to maximize rent extraction, and technological innovation to improve fisheries’ productivity. This set of relations is underpinned by the assumption that improving fish catch per se would reduce fishers’ poverty. The study of fishing livelihoods on Lake Kossou in Côte d’Ivoire problematizes some of these assumptions. I revisit the “essentialization” of fishers with fish by utilizing the Sustainable Livelihood Approach as a lens of analysis, and by demonstrating that fishers’ livelihoods are based on a diversified portfolio of activities that span multiple sectors. Looking at livelihoods also questions the validity of the conventional “sites” of poverty analysis in fisheries (i.e. the boat, the landing site) and how these lead to misrepresentations of fishers’ livelihoods by emphasizing the upstream elements (catches) to the detriment of downstream activities in the value chain (processing and trading) that are crucial in the realization of fishers’ sustainable livelihoods. Looking at the complexity of fishers’ livelihoods sheds light on the relations between poverty (as an outcome variable) and vulnerability as a constant condition that is linked to access to multiple types of assets, the institutional contexts in which they operate, and the ways in which access to natural resources is constantly re-negotiated. To that effect, this study shows how access to Lake Kossou took a completely new meaning when the coffee-cocoa economy collapsed and young Ivorians saw it as an opportunity being stolen from them by Malian fishers. The context of post-colonial national identity formation (epitomized in the search for “Ivoirité”) served as political justification for claiming new rights to natural resources that had been relatively unimportant until then in economic terms. Finally, this study provides an innovative approach to poverty analysis by emphasizing its multiple dimensions, and by utilizing the statistical fuzzy sets methodology to construct multidimensional poverty indices.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectpovertyen_US
dc.subjectfisheriesen_US
dc.subjectlivelihoodsen_US
dc.subjectLake Kossouen_US
dc.subjectCote d'Ivoireen_US
dc.subjectfuzzy setsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.chairStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansing, Stephen J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaro, Mamadouen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGosner, Kevinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2061en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747136en_US
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