Project GENESIS: Community Assessment of a Rural Southeastern Arizona Border Community

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194342
Title:
Project GENESIS: Community Assessment of a Rural Southeastern Arizona Border Community
Author:
Bennett, Amanda Dawn
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: The aim of this study was to understand the health issues of a rural Southeastern Arizona border community. More specifically, this study used community assessment with ethnographic principles to: 1) Conduct a community assessment centered on definitions of health, access to care, quality of care, and health needs in a rural Southeastern Arizona border community; and 2) Compared the findings of this study to previous studies, models, and theories of rural nursing and rural health.Background: It is important to understand that each community has a unique set of health priorities that are dictated by these factors; making every rural community different. Much of the work that has been done in rural America has been performed in the Midwest, Southeast, or Northern states. There is limited information regarding Arizona or even Southern US border communities and whether previous work can be generalized to areas that have not been studied.Sample and Methodology: This study utilized community assessment with ethnographic underpinnings through the use of focus groups, key informant interviews, participant observation, and secondary data analysis of existing community data. Sampling for the focus groups and key informants was purposive. Focus groups included: 1) participants who use local health services and 2) participants who do not.Analysis: Lincoln and Guba's (1985) guidelines for rigor in qualitative studies was utilized. Thematic analysis and thick description were used to analyze data. Theoretical triangulation was performed between individual, group, and community level data with theoretical linkages made to community capacity theory and rural nursing key concepts.Implications and Conclusions: The location of this project, rural Arizona community, near the US-Mexico border, posed an interesting contrast to the proposed concepts widely being used today. From this study, healthcare leaders in this community are better equipped to provide relevant, high-quality, and safe services; but an informed community emerged that has an interest in promoting the health and well-being of the community as a whole.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
advanced practice nurse; border health; community assessment; rural health; rural nursing
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reel, Sally
Committee Chair:
Reel, Sally

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleProject GENESIS: Community Assessment of a Rural Southeastern Arizona Border Communityen_US
dc.creatorBennett, Amanda Dawnen_US
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Amanda Dawnen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: The aim of this study was to understand the health issues of a rural Southeastern Arizona border community. More specifically, this study used community assessment with ethnographic principles to: 1) Conduct a community assessment centered on definitions of health, access to care, quality of care, and health needs in a rural Southeastern Arizona border community; and 2) Compared the findings of this study to previous studies, models, and theories of rural nursing and rural health.Background: It is important to understand that each community has a unique set of health priorities that are dictated by these factors; making every rural community different. Much of the work that has been done in rural America has been performed in the Midwest, Southeast, or Northern states. There is limited information regarding Arizona or even Southern US border communities and whether previous work can be generalized to areas that have not been studied.Sample and Methodology: This study utilized community assessment with ethnographic underpinnings through the use of focus groups, key informant interviews, participant observation, and secondary data analysis of existing community data. Sampling for the focus groups and key informants was purposive. Focus groups included: 1) participants who use local health services and 2) participants who do not.Analysis: Lincoln and Guba's (1985) guidelines for rigor in qualitative studies was utilized. Thematic analysis and thick description were used to analyze data. Theoretical triangulation was performed between individual, group, and community level data with theoretical linkages made to community capacity theory and rural nursing key concepts.Implications and Conclusions: The location of this project, rural Arizona community, near the US-Mexico border, posed an interesting contrast to the proposed concepts widely being used today. From this study, healthcare leaders in this community are better equipped to provide relevant, high-quality, and safe services; but an informed community emerged that has an interest in promoting the health and well-being of the community as a whole.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectadvanced practice nurseen_US
dc.subjectborder healthen_US
dc.subjectcommunity assessmenten_US
dc.subjectrural healthen_US
dc.subjectrural nursingen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReel, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.chairReel, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAbraham, Ivoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMichaels, Cathyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10319en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750943en_US
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