Preventing Child Maltreatment in Military Families: Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Tutorial for Mandated Reporters

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194336
Title:
Preventing Child Maltreatment in Military Families: Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Tutorial for Mandated Reporters
Author:
Phipps, Lorri Marie
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Introduction: Child maltreatment continues to be a significant public health concern in civilian and military communities alike. Child maltreatment has profound short and long term negative effects on children and families and is tremendously costly to society. There are several correlates of child maltreatment unique to the military family: deployment of the active duty service member and living in an overseas duty locations.Rationale: The high rate of deployments within the Marine Corps military community in Japan makes these children particularly vulnerable to child maltreatment. Many forms of child maltreatment are most significant in school aged children, and nearly all maltreated children display recognizable signs and symptoms including physical, emotional, and behavioral characteristics, but also academic difficulties which can be best detected by the educator or other school personnel. Thus, the importance of improving school personnel's knowledge regarding the recognition and response of child maltreatment is especially important. Department of Defense Dependent Schools (DoDDS) teachers, school professionals, and staff with direct student contact spend a significant amount of time with military children and are in a prime position to recognize and respond to at-risk and maltreated children.Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study was to pilot a web-based child maltreatment tutorial for DoDDS teachers, school professionals and support staff with direct student contact within the Marine Corps community in Japan. The goal was to determine whether these professionals would gain information about child maltreatment in general and specific to the military families in Japan.Methods: Thirty-three eligible school personnel within the DoDDS school district in Japan participated in the study. A pre-test /post-test design was used to determine the effectiveness of the tutorial in increasing participant knowledge of risk factors, signs and symptoms, and reporting procedures for child maltreatment.Results: Findings indicated that participants' post-test scores were significantly higher than pre-test scores (p <0.001). The majority of participants indicated that they liked the format and self-paced nature of the tutorial.Conclusions: This exploratory study demonstrated the effectiveness of a web-based tutorial to disseminate information about child maltreatment in military families.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
advanced practice; child maltreatment; military families; nursing
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Michaels, Cathy L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePreventing Child Maltreatment in Military Families: Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Tutorial for Mandated Reportersen_US
dc.creatorPhipps, Lorri Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhipps, Lorri Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Child maltreatment continues to be a significant public health concern in civilian and military communities alike. Child maltreatment has profound short and long term negative effects on children and families and is tremendously costly to society. There are several correlates of child maltreatment unique to the military family: deployment of the active duty service member and living in an overseas duty locations.Rationale: The high rate of deployments within the Marine Corps military community in Japan makes these children particularly vulnerable to child maltreatment. Many forms of child maltreatment are most significant in school aged children, and nearly all maltreated children display recognizable signs and symptoms including physical, emotional, and behavioral characteristics, but also academic difficulties which can be best detected by the educator or other school personnel. Thus, the importance of improving school personnel's knowledge regarding the recognition and response of child maltreatment is especially important. Department of Defense Dependent Schools (DoDDS) teachers, school professionals, and staff with direct student contact spend a significant amount of time with military children and are in a prime position to recognize and respond to at-risk and maltreated children.Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study was to pilot a web-based child maltreatment tutorial for DoDDS teachers, school professionals and support staff with direct student contact within the Marine Corps community in Japan. The goal was to determine whether these professionals would gain information about child maltreatment in general and specific to the military families in Japan.Methods: Thirty-three eligible school personnel within the DoDDS school district in Japan participated in the study. A pre-test /post-test design was used to determine the effectiveness of the tutorial in increasing participant knowledge of risk factors, signs and symptoms, and reporting procedures for child maltreatment.Results: Findings indicated that participants' post-test scores were significantly higher than pre-test scores (p <0.001). The majority of participants indicated that they liked the format and self-paced nature of the tutorial.Conclusions: This exploratory study demonstrated the effectiveness of a web-based tutorial to disseminate information about child maltreatment in military families.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectadvanced practiceen_US
dc.subjectchild maltreatmenten_US
dc.subjectmilitary familiesen_US
dc.subjectnursingen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMichaels, Cathy L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMichaels, Cathy L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEffken, Judith A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMay, Kathleen M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10751en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753579en_US
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