"The Underbelly of the Beast" The Role Of Athletic-Academic Advisors In Intercollegiate Athletics

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194323
Title:
"The Underbelly of the Beast" The Role Of Athletic-Academic Advisors In Intercollegiate Athletics
Author:
Perry, Thomas Frank
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Mae West is credited with saying, "When I'm good, I'm good. When I'm bad, I'm very good."Intercollegiate Athletics in American society has taken on the attitude and swagger of the legacy of Mae West. At its very best for the active and passive participant, intercollegiate athletics can be a breath taking, exhilarating experience. However, to attain and maintain successful teams at the competitive pinnacle of its amateur expression, Division I athletics comes with some human costs. The exploitative nature of Division I athletics is hidden in the shadow cast by the cultural myth of the inherent good of competition.While portraying the dynamic working relationship between first-generation college student-athletes and their Athletic-Academic Advisors, this qualitative study presents a case that concludes that the objectives of intercollegiate athletics function as a cultural action system that inculcates the capitalist paradigm.Despite long standing research that addresses the negative effects of competition, we continue to frantically engage in the effort to outdo others. This has become the paradigm at work, in our schools, and on our playing fields.Yet the true meaning of life can only be discovered through fully experiencing another human being ― by loving him. In the end, the quality of our life is solely predicated on the quality of our relationships.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading & Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ruiz, Richard
Committee Chair:
Ruiz, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.title"The Underbelly of the Beast" The Role Of Athletic-Academic Advisors In Intercollegiate Athleticsen_US
dc.creatorPerry, Thomas Franken_US
dc.contributor.authorPerry, Thomas Franken_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMae West is credited with saying, "When I'm good, I'm good. When I'm bad, I'm very good."Intercollegiate Athletics in American society has taken on the attitude and swagger of the legacy of Mae West. At its very best for the active and passive participant, intercollegiate athletics can be a breath taking, exhilarating experience. However, to attain and maintain successful teams at the competitive pinnacle of its amateur expression, Division I athletics comes with some human costs. The exploitative nature of Division I athletics is hidden in the shadow cast by the cultural myth of the inherent good of competition.While portraying the dynamic working relationship between first-generation college student-athletes and their Athletic-Academic Advisors, this qualitative study presents a case that concludes that the objectives of intercollegiate athletics function as a cultural action system that inculcates the capitalist paradigm.Despite long standing research that addresses the negative effects of competition, we continue to frantically engage in the effort to outdo others. This has become the paradigm at work, in our schools, and on our playing fields.Yet the true meaning of life can only be discovered through fully experiencing another human being ― by loving him. In the end, the quality of our life is solely predicated on the quality of our relationships.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.chairRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaddy-Bernstein, Carolynen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoll, Luisen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1107en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746239en_US
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