TEXTUAL AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVIDENCE FOR PILGRIMAGE IN THE CENTRAL HILL COUNTRY OF THE SOUTHERN LEVANT DURING THE LATE BRONZE AGE-IRON I TRANSITION PERIOD, CA. 1300-1000 BCE.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194308
Title:
TEXTUAL AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVIDENCE FOR PILGRIMAGE IN THE CENTRAL HILL COUNTRY OF THE SOUTHERN LEVANT DURING THE LATE BRONZE AGE-IRON I TRANSITION PERIOD, CA. 1300-1000 BCE.
Author:
Adams, Kerry Lyn
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research evaluates the textual and archaeological evidence for pilgrimage in the Iron I central hill country of the southern Levant during the Late Bronze Age-Iron I transition period (ca. 1300-1000 BCE). The central hill country comprises the Judean and Samarian hills that are located west of the Jordan River and rise near Hebron to the south and end in the north near Dothan. This location and time period reflect the nascent stages of Israelite identity. Pilgrimage provides new perspectives through which to evaluate a specific aspect of early Israelite religion and culture. This research demonstrates that pilgrimage to ceremonial sites, where processions and ritual performances were held, provided avenues for families and clans to come together for a collective purpose and to fulfill collective needs. Pilgrimage has many facets that transect social, economic, and political agendas. By looking at the entire network of sites availed in the archaeological and textual record that apply to the Iron I central hills, from household shrines to shrines of regional and cross-clan appeal, this research suggests that there were several scales of pilgrimage evident in the central highlands. Each scale of pilgrimage had different sociological implications, but primarily pilgrimage provided avenues for people to exchange goods and services without losing honor, negotiate status, and bond over a collective awareness of kinship and community that provided avenues for disparate tribes to coalesce into a coherent political body.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
EARLY ISRAELITE; PILGRIMAGE
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Near Eastern Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Alpert Nakhai, Beth

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTEXTUAL AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVIDENCE FOR PILGRIMAGE IN THE CENTRAL HILL COUNTRY OF THE SOUTHERN LEVANT DURING THE LATE BRONZE AGE-IRON I TRANSITION PERIOD, CA. 1300-1000 BCE.en_US
dc.creatorAdams, Kerry Lynen_US
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Kerry Lynen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research evaluates the textual and archaeological evidence for pilgrimage in the Iron I central hill country of the southern Levant during the Late Bronze Age-Iron I transition period (ca. 1300-1000 BCE). The central hill country comprises the Judean and Samarian hills that are located west of the Jordan River and rise near Hebron to the south and end in the north near Dothan. This location and time period reflect the nascent stages of Israelite identity. Pilgrimage provides new perspectives through which to evaluate a specific aspect of early Israelite religion and culture. This research demonstrates that pilgrimage to ceremonial sites, where processions and ritual performances were held, provided avenues for families and clans to come together for a collective purpose and to fulfill collective needs. Pilgrimage has many facets that transect social, economic, and political agendas. By looking at the entire network of sites availed in the archaeological and textual record that apply to the Iron I central hills, from household shrines to shrines of regional and cross-clan appeal, this research suggests that there were several scales of pilgrimage evident in the central highlands. Each scale of pilgrimage had different sociological implications, but primarily pilgrimage provided avenues for people to exchange goods and services without losing honor, negotiate status, and bond over a collective awareness of kinship and community that provided avenues for disparate tribes to coalesce into a coherent political body.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEARLY ISRAELITEen_US
dc.subjectPILGRIMAGEen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairAlpert Nakhai, Bethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWright, J. Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBetteridge, Anne H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBonine, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11011en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659754958en_US
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