Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194301
Title:
A Model of Transactive Memory Development in Teams
Author:
Pearsall, Matthew J
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Transactive memory, the cooperative division of labor for learning, remembering, and communicating relevant team knowledge (e.g., Hollingshead, 2001), allows team members to smoothly coordinate their discrete areas of expertise. As it consists of both a memory structure and knowledge transactions, researchers have taken two different approaches towards studying transactive memory, viewing it either through its cognitive manifestations (e.g., Lewis, 2003) or its transactional behaviors (e.g., Ellis, 2006).The purpose of this study was to propose and test a model of transactive memory development that integrates both approaches. To do so, I introduce a two-stage model in which the cognitive dimensions of transactive memory emerge through specific transactive memory behaviors. In the first stage, the structure of team knowledge is formed as members share information about their areas of expertise. The emergence of the team memory schema allows for the sharing and retrieval of information in the second stage, when members learn to trust and coordinate with the expertise of their teammates, leading to the smooth flow of information in and out of the team's transactive memory. To test this model, I arrayed 360 students into 90 four-person teams which engaged in a computerized, dynamic, command and control simulation.While results failed to support the model as a whole, most hypothesized relationships were supported. Specifically, need for cognition and reward structure influenced behaviors and cognitions, while specialization and coordination were related to the hypothesized outcomes of each stage. Finally, the relationship between specialization and coordination was partially mediated by information allocation.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Management; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ellis, Aleksander PJ
Committee Chair:
Ellis, Aleksander PJ

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleA Model of Transactive Memory Development in Teamsen_US
dc.creatorPearsall, Matthew Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorPearsall, Matthew Jen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTransactive memory, the cooperative division of labor for learning, remembering, and communicating relevant team knowledge (e.g., Hollingshead, 2001), allows team members to smoothly coordinate their discrete areas of expertise. As it consists of both a memory structure and knowledge transactions, researchers have taken two different approaches towards studying transactive memory, viewing it either through its cognitive manifestations (e.g., Lewis, 2003) or its transactional behaviors (e.g., Ellis, 2006).The purpose of this study was to propose and test a model of transactive memory development that integrates both approaches. To do so, I introduce a two-stage model in which the cognitive dimensions of transactive memory emerge through specific transactive memory behaviors. In the first stage, the structure of team knowledge is formed as members share information about their areas of expertise. The emergence of the team memory schema allows for the sharing and retrieval of information in the second stage, when members learn to trust and coordinate with the expertise of their teammates, leading to the smooth flow of information in and out of the team's transactive memory. To test this model, I arrayed 360 students into 90 four-person teams which engaged in a computerized, dynamic, command and control simulation.While results failed to support the model as a whole, most hypothesized relationships were supported. Specifically, need for cognition and reward structure influenced behaviors and cognitions, while specialization and coordination were related to the hypothesized outcomes of each stage. Finally, the relationship between specialization and coordination was partially mediated by information allocation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEllis, Aleksander PJen_US
dc.contributor.chairEllis, Aleksander PJen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCropanzano, Russellen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlaughter, Jerelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2560en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748491en_US
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