STRESS AND EPISODIC MEMORY: THE FATE OF NEUTRAL VERSUS EMOTIONAL INFORMATION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194299
Title:
STRESS AND EPISODIC MEMORY: THE FATE OF NEUTRAL VERSUS EMOTIONAL INFORMATION
Author:
Payne, Jessica Danielle
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This paper describes two experiments, each of which investigated the impact of stress on human episodic memory. All participants watched narrated slide shows containing emotional and neutral information. Experiment 1 demonstrated that pre-learning exposure to a psychological stressor (the Trier Social Stress Test or "TSST"; Kirschbaum, Pirke & Hellhammer, 1993) preserved or enhanced memory for emotional aspects of the slide show, but impaired memory for neutral aspects of the slide show. Moreover, stress exposure disrupted memory for information that was visually and thematically central to the slide show. Memory for peripheral information, on the other hand, was unaffected by stress. Experiment 2 replicated these results and extended them to a similar paradigm, where participants viewed separate emotional and neutral slide shows, and saliva was tested for the stress hormones cortisol and norepinephrine. Similar to the results of Experiment 1, stress disrupted memory for the neutral slide show, but enhanced memory for the emotional slide show. Salivary cortisol levels at retrieval were negatively correlated with memory for the neutral slide show. These results are consistent with theories invoking differential effects of stress on brain systems responsible for encoding and retrieving emotional memories (the amygdala) and non-emotional memories (e.g. the hippocampal formation, frontal cortex), and inconsistent with the view that memories formed under high levels of stress are qualitatively the same as those formed under ordinary emotional circumstances. These data, which are also consistent with results obtained in a number of studies using animals and humans, have implications for the traumatic memory debate and theories regarding human memory.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
episodic memory; stress; HPA axis; emotional information; neutral information; cortisol; norepinephrine
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Nadel, Lynn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSTRESS AND EPISODIC MEMORY: THE FATE OF NEUTRAL VERSUS EMOTIONAL INFORMATIONen_US
dc.creatorPayne, Jessica Danielleen_US
dc.contributor.authorPayne, Jessica Danielleen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper describes two experiments, each of which investigated the impact of stress on human episodic memory. All participants watched narrated slide shows containing emotional and neutral information. Experiment 1 demonstrated that pre-learning exposure to a psychological stressor (the Trier Social Stress Test or "TSST"; Kirschbaum, Pirke & Hellhammer, 1993) preserved or enhanced memory for emotional aspects of the slide show, but impaired memory for neutral aspects of the slide show. Moreover, stress exposure disrupted memory for information that was visually and thematically central to the slide show. Memory for peripheral information, on the other hand, was unaffected by stress. Experiment 2 replicated these results and extended them to a similar paradigm, where participants viewed separate emotional and neutral slide shows, and saliva was tested for the stress hormones cortisol and norepinephrine. Similar to the results of Experiment 1, stress disrupted memory for the neutral slide show, but enhanced memory for the emotional slide show. Salivary cortisol levels at retrieval were negatively correlated with memory for the neutral slide show. These results are consistent with theories invoking differential effects of stress on brain systems responsible for encoding and retrieving emotional memories (the amygdala) and non-emotional memories (e.g. the hippocampal formation, frontal cortex), and inconsistent with the view that memories formed under high levels of stress are qualitatively the same as those formed under ordinary emotional circumstances. These data, which are also consistent with results obtained in a number of studies using animals and humans, have implications for the traumatic memory debate and theories regarding human memory.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectepisodic memoryen_US
dc.subjectstressen_US
dc.subjectHPA axisen_US
dc.subjectemotional informationen_US
dc.subjectneutral informationen_US
dc.subjectcortisolen_US
dc.subjectnorepinephrineen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairNadel, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNadel, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRyan, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJacobs, W. Jakeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBootzin, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaszniak, Alen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1159en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746253en_US
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