Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194294
Title:
Segregation of Visual Information in the Bee Brain
Author:
Paulk, Angelique
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Photoreceptors in the eye basically provide information about light intensities from which brains extract different kinds of visual cues (e.g. color, movement, pattern). How do the properties and response characteristic of visual interneurons differ from the periphery to the central brain? I intracellularly recorded from neurons in the second and third optic ganglia (medulla and lobula) and the central brain (protocerebrum) of bees (mainly bumblebees; Bombus impatiens) while presenting color and motion stimuli. Bees rely on such stimuli during flight and foraging and show sophisticated visual learning abilities. We found that neurons in the distal medulla are color specific while ones in the proximal medulla show complex, often antagonistic color responses. Neurons in the distal lobula (layers 1-4) mainly process motion information while the proximal lobula (layers 5 and 6) seems to combine color and motion responses. Anterior parts of the central brain receive complex input representing combinations of motion and color information characterized by specific temporal properties (e.g. temporal precision, 'novelty' information or entrainment). This kind of often sparsely coded information is also represented in the mushroom bodies, learning and memory centers in the insect brain. In contrast, posterior parts of the central brain receive mainly motion information and show more reliable responses yet less precise spike timing. While the former kind of information (temporally precise or novelty in anterior pathways) is suited to form stimulus associations relevant during foraging, the latter, more reliable information is thought to support fast optomotor flight control maneuvers and other less plastic behaviors.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
bumblebee; precision; reliability; lobula; protocerebrum; medulla
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Insect Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gronenberg, Wulfila; Strausfeld, Nicholas J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSegregation of Visual Information in the Bee Brainen_US
dc.creatorPaulk, Angeliqueen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaulk, Angeliqueen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPhotoreceptors in the eye basically provide information about light intensities from which brains extract different kinds of visual cues (e.g. color, movement, pattern). How do the properties and response characteristic of visual interneurons differ from the periphery to the central brain? I intracellularly recorded from neurons in the second and third optic ganglia (medulla and lobula) and the central brain (protocerebrum) of bees (mainly bumblebees; Bombus impatiens) while presenting color and motion stimuli. Bees rely on such stimuli during flight and foraging and show sophisticated visual learning abilities. We found that neurons in the distal medulla are color specific while ones in the proximal medulla show complex, often antagonistic color responses. Neurons in the distal lobula (layers 1-4) mainly process motion information while the proximal lobula (layers 5 and 6) seems to combine color and motion responses. Anterior parts of the central brain receive complex input representing combinations of motion and color information characterized by specific temporal properties (e.g. temporal precision, 'novelty' information or entrainment). This kind of often sparsely coded information is also represented in the mushroom bodies, learning and memory centers in the insect brain. In contrast, posterior parts of the central brain receive mainly motion information and show more reliable responses yet less precise spike timing. While the former kind of information (temporally precise or novelty in anterior pathways) is suited to form stimulus associations relevant during foraging, the latter, more reliable information is thought to support fast optomotor flight control maneuvers and other less plastic behaviors.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectbumblebeeen_US
dc.subjectprecisionen_US
dc.subjectreliabilityen_US
dc.subjectlobulaen_US
dc.subjectprotocerebrumen_US
dc.subjectmedullaen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInsect Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGronenberg, Wulfilaen_US
dc.contributor.chairStrausfeld, Nicholas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLevine, Ricken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristensen, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFellous, Jean-Marcen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHiggins, Charles M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2821en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749883en_US
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