All-Optical Clock Recovery, Photonic Balancing, and Saturated Asymmetric Filtering For Fiber Optic Communication Systems

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194287
Title:
All-Optical Clock Recovery, Photonic Balancing, and Saturated Asymmetric Filtering For Fiber Optic Communication Systems
Author:
Parsons, Earl Ryan
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation I investigated a multi-channel and multi-bit rate all-optical clock recovery device. This device, a birefringent Fabry-Perot resonator, had previously been demonstrated to simultaneously recover the clock signal from 10 wavelength channels operating at 10 Gb/s and one channel at 40 Gb/s. Similar to clock signals recovered from a conventional Fabry-Perot resonator, the clock signal from the birefringent resonator suffers from a bit pattern effect. I investigated this bit pattern effect for birefringent resonators numerically and experimentally and found that the bit pattern effect is less prominent than for clock signals from a conventional Fabry-Perot resonator.I also demonstrated photonic balancing which is an all-optical alternative to electrical balanced detection for phase shift keyed signals. An RZ-DPSK data signal was demodulated using a delay interferometer. The two logically opposite outputs from the delay interferometer then counter-propagated in a saturated SOA. This process created a differential signal which used all the signal power present in two consecutive symbols. I showed that this scheme could provide an optical alternative to electrical balanced detection by reducing the required OSNR by 3 dB.I also show how this method can provide amplitude regeneration to a signal after modulation format conversion. In this case an RZ-DPSK signal was converted to an amplitude modulation signal by the delay interferometer. The resulting amplitude modulated signal is degraded by both the amplitude noise and the phase noise of the original signal. The two logically opposite outputs from the delay interferometer again counter-propagated in a saturated SOA. Through limiting amplification and noise modulation this scheme provided amplitude regeneration and improved the Q-factor of the demodulated signal by 3.5 dB.Finally I investigated how SPM provided by the SOA can provide a method to reduce the in-band noise of a communication signal. The marks, which represented data, experienced a spectral shift due to SPM while the spaces, which consisted of noise, did not. A bandpass filter placed after the SOA then selected the signal and filtered out what was originally in-band noise. The receiver sensitivity was improved by 3 dB.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
All-Optical Regeneration; All-Optical Signal Processing; Balanced Detection; Clock Recovery; In-Band Noise Filtering
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kueppers, Franko
Committee Chair:
Kueppers, Franko

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAll-Optical Clock Recovery, Photonic Balancing, and Saturated Asymmetric Filtering For Fiber Optic Communication Systemsen_US
dc.creatorParsons, Earl Ryanen_US
dc.contributor.authorParsons, Earl Ryanen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I investigated a multi-channel and multi-bit rate all-optical clock recovery device. This device, a birefringent Fabry-Perot resonator, had previously been demonstrated to simultaneously recover the clock signal from 10 wavelength channels operating at 10 Gb/s and one channel at 40 Gb/s. Similar to clock signals recovered from a conventional Fabry-Perot resonator, the clock signal from the birefringent resonator suffers from a bit pattern effect. I investigated this bit pattern effect for birefringent resonators numerically and experimentally and found that the bit pattern effect is less prominent than for clock signals from a conventional Fabry-Perot resonator.I also demonstrated photonic balancing which is an all-optical alternative to electrical balanced detection for phase shift keyed signals. An RZ-DPSK data signal was demodulated using a delay interferometer. The two logically opposite outputs from the delay interferometer then counter-propagated in a saturated SOA. This process created a differential signal which used all the signal power present in two consecutive symbols. I showed that this scheme could provide an optical alternative to electrical balanced detection by reducing the required OSNR by 3 dB.I also show how this method can provide amplitude regeneration to a signal after modulation format conversion. In this case an RZ-DPSK signal was converted to an amplitude modulation signal by the delay interferometer. The resulting amplitude modulated signal is degraded by both the amplitude noise and the phase noise of the original signal. The two logically opposite outputs from the delay interferometer again counter-propagated in a saturated SOA. Through limiting amplification and noise modulation this scheme provided amplitude regeneration and improved the Q-factor of the demodulated signal by 3.5 dB.Finally I investigated how SPM provided by the SOA can provide a method to reduce the in-band noise of a communication signal. The marks, which represented data, experienced a spectral shift due to SPM while the spaces, which consisted of noise, did not. A bandpass filter placed after the SOA then selected the signal and filtered out what was originally in-band noise. The receiver sensitivity was improved by 3 dB.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAll-Optical Regenerationen_US
dc.subjectAll-Optical Signal Processingen_US
dc.subjectBalanced Detectionen_US
dc.subjectClock Recoveryen_US
dc.subjectIn-Band Noise Filteringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKueppers, Frankoen_US
dc.contributor.chairKueppers, Frankoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeyghambarian, Nasseren_US
dc.contributor.committeemembervon Lerber, Tuomoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11229en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261098en_US
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