Balancing Act: Negotiations of the Athletic and Academic Role Amongst Division I-Football Bowl Subdivision Student-Athletes

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194286
Title:
Balancing Act: Negotiations of the Athletic and Academic Role Amongst Division I-Football Bowl Subdivision Student-Athletes
Author:
Bell, Lydia Foster
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Informed by the words and experiences of 41 Division I-Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) student-athletes, this qualitative study reveals the complexities of the student-athlete academic experience shaped by the expectations of their athletic role, the campus climate, and the NCAA Academic Reform Package. Using role-identity as a theoretical framework, it examines how, over time, these student-athletes have shaped their athletic and academic role-identities, and the roles played in such shaping by those in their academic and athletic role-sets. The study critically examines the academic decisions made by these student-athletes, questions the isomorphic academic and athletic rubric, and proposes suggestions for the enhancement of the student-athlete experience within the confines of the academic reform policies.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
African American students; College athletics; NCAA; role-identity; Sport; student-athletes
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading & Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ruiz, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleBalancing Act: Negotiations of the Athletic and Academic Role Amongst Division I-Football Bowl Subdivision Student-Athletesen_US
dc.creatorBell, Lydia Fosteren_US
dc.contributor.authorBell, Lydia Fosteren_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInformed by the words and experiences of 41 Division I-Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) student-athletes, this qualitative study reveals the complexities of the student-athlete academic experience shaped by the expectations of their athletic role, the campus climate, and the NCAA Academic Reform Package. Using role-identity as a theoretical framework, it examines how, over time, these student-athletes have shaped their athletic and academic role-identities, and the roles played in such shaping by those in their academic and athletic role-sets. The study critically examines the academic decisions made by these student-athletes, questions the isomorphic academic and athletic rubric, and proposes suggestions for the enhancement of the student-athlete experience within the confines of the academic reform policies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAfrican American studentsen_US
dc.subjectCollege athleticsen_US
dc.subjectNCAAen_US
dc.subjectrole-identityen_US
dc.subjectSporten_US
dc.subjectstudent-athletesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLee, Jenny J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCammarota, Julioen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWatson, Scott B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10392en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752005en_US
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