Tip-of-the-tongue States in Aging: Evidence From Behavioral and Neuroimaging Studies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194271
Title:
Tip-of-the-tongue States in Aging: Evidence From Behavioral and Neuroimaging Studies
Author:
Pannu, Jasmeet Kaur
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Metamemory is defined as the knowledge about one's memory capabilities and about strategies that can aid memory (Shimamura, 1994). One particularly intriguing type of metamemory judgment is a tip-of-the-tongue experience, which refers to a strong feeling that a target word, though presently not recalled, is known and on the verge of being produced. Older adults report more TOT experiences than young adults. However, there is great variability among older adults in performance on memory and executive function tasks, and it is unknown whether subsets of older adults experience more TOT states. Additionally, the neural correlates of successful retrieval, TOTs, and unsuccessful retrieval in aging have not been studied. In the studies reported here, the relationship between frontal and medial temporal neuropsychological factor scores (see Glisky et al., 1995) and performance on metamemory tasks was examined. Importantly, this was the first study to examine the neural correlates of tip-of-the-tongue experiences in older adults. In an event-related fMRI design, participants viewed famous and novel faces and were asked to respond regarding successful retrieval, unsuccessful retrieval, or tip-of-the-tongue experiences. Results show that, as a group, older adults had activation in the medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate during tip-of-the-tongue states, consistent with similar studies in young adults (Maril et al., 2001; Pannu et al., 2004, Schnyer et al., 2005). Additionally, activations in lateral prefrontal cortex and medial temporal areas during the task varied systematically with frontal and temporal lobe factor scores. These results provide evidence for differences in neural activation between groups of healthy older adults characterized on the basis of neuropsychological performance, and shed light on the neural underpinnings of the tip-of-the-tongue states in aging.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Metamemory; Memory; Executive Functions; Aging; Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTip-of-the-tongue States in Aging: Evidence From Behavioral and Neuroimaging Studiesen_US
dc.creatorPannu, Jasmeet Kauren_US
dc.contributor.authorPannu, Jasmeet Kauren_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMetamemory is defined as the knowledge about one's memory capabilities and about strategies that can aid memory (Shimamura, 1994). One particularly intriguing type of metamemory judgment is a tip-of-the-tongue experience, which refers to a strong feeling that a target word, though presently not recalled, is known and on the verge of being produced. Older adults report more TOT experiences than young adults. However, there is great variability among older adults in performance on memory and executive function tasks, and it is unknown whether subsets of older adults experience more TOT states. Additionally, the neural correlates of successful retrieval, TOTs, and unsuccessful retrieval in aging have not been studied. In the studies reported here, the relationship between frontal and medial temporal neuropsychological factor scores (see Glisky et al., 1995) and performance on metamemory tasks was examined. Importantly, this was the first study to examine the neural correlates of tip-of-the-tongue experiences in older adults. In an event-related fMRI design, participants viewed famous and novel faces and were asked to respond regarding successful retrieval, unsuccessful retrieval, or tip-of-the-tongue experiences. Results show that, as a group, older adults had activation in the medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate during tip-of-the-tongue states, consistent with similar studies in young adults (Maril et al., 2001; Pannu et al., 2004, Schnyer et al., 2005). Additionally, activations in lateral prefrontal cortex and medial temporal areas during the task varied systematically with frontal and temporal lobe factor scores. These results provide evidence for differences in neural activation between groups of healthy older adults characterized on the basis of neuropsychological performance, and shed light on the neural underpinnings of the tip-of-the-tongue states in aging.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectMetamemoryen_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.subjectExecutive Functionsen_US
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectFunctional Magnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlisky, Elizabeth L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRapcsak, Stevenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRyan, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShoham, Vardaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1749en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747503en_US
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