A Geographic-Information-Systems-Based Approach to Analysis of Characteristics Predicting Student Persistence and Graduation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194256
Title:
A Geographic-Information-Systems-Based Approach to Analysis of Characteristics Predicting Student Persistence and Graduation
Author:
Ousley, Chris
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study sought to provide empirical evidence regarding the use of spatial analysis in enrollment management to predict persistence and graduation. The research utilized data from the 2000 U.S. Census and applicant records from The University of Arizona to study the spatial distributions of enrollments. Based on the initial results, stepwise logistic regression was used to identify spatially associated student and neighborhood characteristics predicting persistence and graduation.The findings of this research indicate spatial analysis can be used as a valuable resource for enrollment management. Using a theoretical framework of the forms of capital and social reproduction, cultural and social capital characteristics were found to influence persistence at statistically significant levels. Most notably, the social capital proxy of neighborhood education levels, and the cultural capital proxies of the number of standardized tests a student has taken, and when the application for admission is submitted all significantly influenced a student's probability to persistence and graduate. When disaggregating by race and ethnicity, resident Hispanic students from highly Hispanic neighborhoods were found to persist at higher levels in the first year of college attendance. Also, resident Native Americans were found to have a higher probability to persist when evidencing cultural capital characteristics. Since spatially based student and neighborhood characteristics can be quantified and mapped, target populations can be identified and subsequently recruited, resulting in retention-focused admissions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
education; enrollment management; GIS; persistence; retention; spatial analysis
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rios Aguilar, Cecilia
Committee Chair:
Rios Aguilar, Cecilia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleA Geographic-Information-Systems-Based Approach to Analysis of Characteristics Predicting Student Persistence and Graduationen_US
dc.creatorOusley, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.authorOusley, Chrisen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study sought to provide empirical evidence regarding the use of spatial analysis in enrollment management to predict persistence and graduation. The research utilized data from the 2000 U.S. Census and applicant records from The University of Arizona to study the spatial distributions of enrollments. Based on the initial results, stepwise logistic regression was used to identify spatially associated student and neighborhood characteristics predicting persistence and graduation.The findings of this research indicate spatial analysis can be used as a valuable resource for enrollment management. Using a theoretical framework of the forms of capital and social reproduction, cultural and social capital characteristics were found to influence persistence at statistically significant levels. Most notably, the social capital proxy of neighborhood education levels, and the cultural capital proxies of the number of standardized tests a student has taken, and when the application for admission is submitted all significantly influenced a student's probability to persistence and graduate. When disaggregating by race and ethnicity, resident Hispanic students from highly Hispanic neighborhoods were found to persist at higher levels in the first year of college attendance. Also, resident Native Americans were found to have a higher probability to persist when evidencing cultural capital characteristics. Since spatially based student and neighborhood characteristics can be quantified and mapped, target populations can be identified and subsequently recruited, resulting in retention-focused admissions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjecteducationen_US
dc.subjectenrollment managementen_US
dc.subjectGISen_US
dc.subjectpersistenceen_US
dc.subjectretentionen_US
dc.subjectspatial analysisen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRios Aguilar, Ceciliaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRios Aguilar, Ceciliaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKohn, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLee, Jennyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMilem, Jeffen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11004en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659754947en_US
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