Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194249
Title:
Adolescent Sleep: Patterns, Perceptions and Coping Behaviors
Author:
Orzech, Kathryn
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Sleep matters for adolescents. It matters for physical and mental health, for success in the classroom and in extracurricular activities, for safety while driving and for protection against potential future psychological problems and substance abuse. Although the recommended nightly amount of sleep for adolescents is over nine hours, many factors interact to preclude teens from getting the sleep they need. This study uses a biocultural, multi-method approach to examine how biological, cultural, and environmental factors interact to affect adolescent sleep behavior in a cohort of 50 high school freshmen in the United States. High school is a place where adolescents learn social and academic skills that will carry them into adult life, but it also provides a space where they are socialized into "how to sleep." By exploring sleep and related behaviors, including ways to cope with inadequate sleep, in a group of teens who were 14 or 15 years old and evenly divided between White and Hispanic and male and female participants, this research explores how sleep is embedded within webs of individual, household-level, school-specific and societal factors. Beyond examining how advice about sleep and teens' experience of sleep behavior is internalized and embodied by adolescents, special attention is paid to the relationships between personal technology use and sleep, and also to the relationships among sleep and food and caffeine intake.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
adolescent; biocultural; coping; ethnography; sleep
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Nichter, Mimi

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAdolescent Sleep: Patterns, Perceptions and Coping Behaviorsen_US
dc.creatorOrzech, Kathrynen_US
dc.contributor.authorOrzech, Kathrynen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSleep matters for adolescents. It matters for physical and mental health, for success in the classroom and in extracurricular activities, for safety while driving and for protection against potential future psychological problems and substance abuse. Although the recommended nightly amount of sleep for adolescents is over nine hours, many factors interact to preclude teens from getting the sleep they need. This study uses a biocultural, multi-method approach to examine how biological, cultural, and environmental factors interact to affect adolescent sleep behavior in a cohort of 50 high school freshmen in the United States. High school is a place where adolescents learn social and academic skills that will carry them into adult life, but it also provides a space where they are socialized into "how to sleep." By exploring sleep and related behaviors, including ways to cope with inadequate sleep, in a group of teens who were 14 or 15 years old and evenly divided between White and Hispanic and male and female participants, this research explores how sleep is embedded within webs of individual, household-level, school-specific and societal factors. Beyond examining how advice about sleep and teens' experience of sleep behavior is internalized and embodied by adolescents, special attention is paid to the relationships between personal technology use and sleep, and also to the relationships among sleep and food and caffeine intake.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectadolescenten_US
dc.subjectbioculturalen_US
dc.subjectcopingen_US
dc.subjectethnographyen_US
dc.subjectsleepen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairNichter, Mimien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPike, Ivy L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11081en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659755019en_US
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