Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194248
Title:
Queer Subjectivities in Early Modern England
Author:
Orvis, David L.
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
"Queer Subjectivities in Early Modern England" contests the prevailing scholarly view that the formation of queer subjectivities could not have preceded the rise to prominence of more modern regimes of gender and sexuality, the hegemonic homo/hetero divide in particular. To the contrary, I demonstrate not only that throughout the period one could construct a sense of self around same- or mixed-sex object choices, but also that the attendant processes of subject formation enabled the development of conspicuously queer(ed) subjectivities---namely, the soldier, the bedfellow, and the sodomite. Tracing the salience of these subjectivities across a multitude of discourses---tragedies, comedies, and problem plays; epic and lyric poems; war manuals and martial conduct books; pro- and anti-theatrical polemics; vernacular translations of classical texts; and more---I show that queer subject formation was both widely recognized and variously interpreted, functioning in some instances (e.g., in the soldier) as a site of profound anxiety, in others (the bedfellow and the sodomite) as an empowering form of dissidence.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
McBride, Kari B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleQueer Subjectivities in Early Modern Englanden_US
dc.creatorOrvis, David L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOrvis, David L.en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstract"Queer Subjectivities in Early Modern England" contests the prevailing scholarly view that the formation of queer subjectivities could not have preceded the rise to prominence of more modern regimes of gender and sexuality, the hegemonic homo/hetero divide in particular. To the contrary, I demonstrate not only that throughout the period one could construct a sense of self around same- or mixed-sex object choices, but also that the attendant processes of subject formation enabled the development of conspicuously queer(ed) subjectivities---namely, the soldier, the bedfellow, and the sodomite. Tracing the salience of these subjectivities across a multitude of discourses---tragedies, comedies, and problem plays; epic and lyric poems; war manuals and martial conduct books; pro- and anti-theatrical polemics; vernacular translations of classical texts; and more---I show that queer subject formation was both widely recognized and variously interpreted, functioning in some instances (e.g., in the soldier) as a site of profound anxiety, in others (the bedfellow and the sodomite) as an empowering form of dissidence.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMcBride, Kari B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcBride, Kari B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, Meg Lotaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRobinson, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUlreich, John C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2723en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749739en_US
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