The Work Experiences of Student Affairs Professionals: What Values Guide Practice?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194239
Title:
The Work Experiences of Student Affairs Professionals: What Values Guide Practice?
Author:
Orgera, Jeffrey Michael
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One segment of the academic community that is overlooked in most research is the large cadre of professionals who deliver a multitude of services to students outside of the classroom. From the perspective of students, the student affairs professionals they encounter in the residence halls, advising offices, and within other aspects of the campus life fabric, are the face of the university. This case study of student affairs professionals within four departments at one large, public, Research-I University seeks to define the core values of the work, understand perspectives on the individuals they work with, how practice unfolds within the organization context of the campus, and what values guide practice. The literatures drawn upon include; student affairs ideology, service delivery patterns and techniques, institutional theory, professional specialization, and trends in higher education. The findings from this study illustrate that the work experiences of student affairs professionals are dominated by brief encounters with students that occur within a work environment that is frequently overwhelming. High volumes of students seeking service and limited opportunities to develop ongoing relationships create challenging work expectations for student affairs professionals. The core values of the profession are in transition as institutional priorities that focus on efficiency and competitive advantage become further established within academe. Policy recommendations for the student affairs profession and institutional decision makers are made in the final chapter.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
work experiences; student affairs professionals; higher education; values; practice; student development
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rhoades, Gary D.
Committee Chair:
Rhoades, Gary D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Work Experiences of Student Affairs Professionals: What Values Guide Practice?en_US
dc.creatorOrgera, Jeffrey Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorOrgera, Jeffrey Michaelen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne segment of the academic community that is overlooked in most research is the large cadre of professionals who deliver a multitude of services to students outside of the classroom. From the perspective of students, the student affairs professionals they encounter in the residence halls, advising offices, and within other aspects of the campus life fabric, are the face of the university. This case study of student affairs professionals within four departments at one large, public, Research-I University seeks to define the core values of the work, understand perspectives on the individuals they work with, how practice unfolds within the organization context of the campus, and what values guide practice. The literatures drawn upon include; student affairs ideology, service delivery patterns and techniques, institutional theory, professional specialization, and trends in higher education. The findings from this study illustrate that the work experiences of student affairs professionals are dominated by brief encounters with students that occur within a work environment that is frequently overwhelming. High volumes of students seeking service and limited opportunities to develop ongoing relationships create challenging work expectations for student affairs professionals. The core values of the profession are in transition as institutional priorities that focus on efficiency and competitive advantage become further established within academe. Policy recommendations for the student affairs profession and institutional decision makers are made in the final chapter.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectwork experiencesen_US
dc.subjectstudent affairs professionalsen_US
dc.subjecthigher educationen_US
dc.subjectvaluesen_US
dc.subjectpracticeen_US
dc.subjectstudent developmenten_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Gary D.en_US
dc.contributor.chairRhoades, Gary D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCheslock, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLee, Jennyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2097en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747205en_US
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