Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194198
Title:
SHARED DISPLAY RULES AND EMOTIONAL LABOR IN WORK TEAMS
Author:
Becker, William J.
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Emotions are an important part of the workplace. Emotional labor describes the monitoring and management of one's emotions at work. Employees perform emotional labor in response to explicit and perceived display rules for emotional expressions in the workplace. While compliance with these rules is generally beneficial for the organization, it may be detrimental to employee well-being.This study proposes a process model of emotional labor that extends from display rules to job attitudes and behaviors. It is unique in that it investigates display rules and emotional labor at the group level of analysis. It also includes coworkers as well as customers as targets of emotional labor. Display rule commitment is proposed as an important moderator between emotional labor and important individual job attitudes and behaviors that may account for previously mixed findings in the literature.The hypotheses of this study received general support. Specifically, group level display rules and emotional labor were viable constructs that had important consequences for job outcomes. Display rule commitment was an important predictor of job attitudes and behaviors and moderated the relationship between group level surface acting and emotional exhaustion. In addition, group level emotional labor showed a significant effect on a number of important job outcomes. It also moderated the relationship between individual level emotional labor and job attitudes and behaviors. These findings provide several promising new insights and directions for emotional labor research.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Display Rules; Emotion; Emotional Labor
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Management; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cropanzano, Russell
Committee Chair:
Cropanzano, Russell

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSHARED DISPLAY RULES AND EMOTIONAL LABOR IN WORK TEAMSen_US
dc.creatorBecker, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBecker, William J.en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEmotions are an important part of the workplace. Emotional labor describes the monitoring and management of one's emotions at work. Employees perform emotional labor in response to explicit and perceived display rules for emotional expressions in the workplace. While compliance with these rules is generally beneficial for the organization, it may be detrimental to employee well-being.This study proposes a process model of emotional labor that extends from display rules to job attitudes and behaviors. It is unique in that it investigates display rules and emotional labor at the group level of analysis. It also includes coworkers as well as customers as targets of emotional labor. Display rule commitment is proposed as an important moderator between emotional labor and important individual job attitudes and behaviors that may account for previously mixed findings in the literature.The hypotheses of this study received general support. Specifically, group level display rules and emotional labor were viable constructs that had important consequences for job outcomes. Display rule commitment was an important predictor of job attitudes and behaviors and moderated the relationship between group level surface acting and emotional exhaustion. In addition, group level emotional labor showed a significant effect on a number of important job outcomes. It also moderated the relationship between individual level emotional labor and job attitudes and behaviors. These findings provide several promising new insights and directions for emotional labor research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDisplay Rulesen_US
dc.subjectEmotionen_US
dc.subjectEmotional Laboren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCropanzano, Russellen_US
dc.contributor.chairCropanzano, Russellen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEllis, Aleksanderen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGutek, Barbaraen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10864en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753772en_US
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