Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194197
Title:
IMPROVING MEASUREMENT STRATEGIES FOR I CHOOSE LIFE-AFRICA
Author:
Adam, Mary Beth
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Objective: The substantial prevalence of HIV in Africa underscores the urgent need for effective HIV prevention programs. This paper reports the results of an effectiveness trial for the I Choose Life-Africa (ICL) HIV prevention program carried out among Kenyan university students.Methods: Longitudinal data was analyzed from182 student volunteers, randomized to an intervention or control group. The intervention group received training as HIV prevention peer educators with a 32 hour theoretically based curriculum. All students were given a pretest survey assessing HIV related attitudes, intentions, knowledge and behaviors and repeated the survey 3 times over the next 6 months. Data was analyzed using Linear Mixed Models (LMM) or Generalized Linear Models (GLM) to compare the rate of change on 13 dependent variables that examined sexual risk behavior (broadly defined). Monitoring data on the types of HIV prevention messages delivered by the peer educators was obtained.Results: Based on multi level models, the slope coefficients for 4 variables showed small but reliable change in the hoped for direction: abstinence from oral, vaginal, or anal sex in the last two months, condom attitudes, HIV testing, and refusal skill. The intervention demonstrated evidence of non-zero slope coefficients in the hoped for direction on 12 of 13 dependent variables. Trained peer educators delivered HIV prevention messages in a one- to- one format 1,862 times and reached 1,819 students through small group sessions. Messages were delivered at larger group thematic sessions that were attended by a total of 5,970 persons. Condom distribution projects resulted in 3,742 male and 796 female condoms being distributed, and 268 individuals were referred for HIV testing.Conclusion: The ICL peer education training appears effective in reducing sexual risk behavior and training students to promote HIV prevention messages.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Behavior Change; HIV; HIV Prevention; Kenya; Peer Educators
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sechrest, Lee
Committee Chair:
Sechrest, Lee

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleIMPROVING MEASUREMENT STRATEGIES FOR I CHOOSE LIFE-AFRICAen_US
dc.creatorAdam, Mary Bethen_US
dc.contributor.authorAdam, Mary Bethen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: The substantial prevalence of HIV in Africa underscores the urgent need for effective HIV prevention programs. This paper reports the results of an effectiveness trial for the I Choose Life-Africa (ICL) HIV prevention program carried out among Kenyan university students.Methods: Longitudinal data was analyzed from182 student volunteers, randomized to an intervention or control group. The intervention group received training as HIV prevention peer educators with a 32 hour theoretically based curriculum. All students were given a pretest survey assessing HIV related attitudes, intentions, knowledge and behaviors and repeated the survey 3 times over the next 6 months. Data was analyzed using Linear Mixed Models (LMM) or Generalized Linear Models (GLM) to compare the rate of change on 13 dependent variables that examined sexual risk behavior (broadly defined). Monitoring data on the types of HIV prevention messages delivered by the peer educators was obtained.Results: Based on multi level models, the slope coefficients for 4 variables showed small but reliable change in the hoped for direction: abstinence from oral, vaginal, or anal sex in the last two months, condom attitudes, HIV testing, and refusal skill. The intervention demonstrated evidence of non-zero slope coefficients in the hoped for direction on 12 of 13 dependent variables. Trained peer educators delivered HIV prevention messages in a one- to- one format 1,862 times and reached 1,819 students through small group sessions. Messages were delivered at larger group thematic sessions that were attended by a total of 5,970 persons. Condom distribution projects resulted in 3,742 male and 796 female condoms being distributed, and 268 individuals were referred for HIV testing.Conclusion: The ICL peer education training appears effective in reducing sexual risk behavior and training students to promote HIV prevention messages.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectBehavior Changeen_US
dc.subjectHIVen_US
dc.subjectHIV Preventionen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.subjectPeer Educatorsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.chairSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBootzin, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Mendeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFigueredo, Aurelio Jen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMehl, Matthiasen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10336en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659751926en_US
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