Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194185
Title:
Automobiles, the Mass Market, and the Retail Revolution
Author:
Neumann, Todd
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Retailing is the third largest segment of the American economy. It is unique among many sectors of the economy because virtually every American is a daily customer. Despite this important role, few economists have studied the fascinating changes that have occurred in this industry. This dissertation explores what, when, and why changes occurred in the industry during the 20th Century. The period between 1900--1930 is identified as a key point when two new demand-side consumer technologies, the automobile and radio, fueled the beginnings of a retail revolution. The most important of these innovations was the automobile. Unlike typical supply-side technological innovations that are implemented by the firm, the car was a technology that the consumer was left to adopt. Yet, by lowering local travel costs, it changed access to stores in a variety of ways and like supply side innovations the car profoundly affected the way stores produced the retail service.In the process the size of retail stores increased dramatically. The reduction in the number of stores and the increase in population meant stores were not locating as close to the average consumer as in the past. Stores began to offer a selection of products unheard of at the turn of the century. Not only did they offer more brands of each product, but they also broadened the selection of different products. Corporate-owned chain stores started to supplant the independent retailer. Finally, retail workers became more specialized, and a smaller share of the workforce directly interacted with the customer.This dissertation characterizes these changes and quantifies the impact that new consumer technologies had on the size, number, and labor intensity of retail stores.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Economics
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Economics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fishback, Price V
Committee Chair:
Fishback, Price V

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAutomobiles, the Mass Market, and the Retail Revolutionen_US
dc.creatorNeumann, Todden_US
dc.contributor.authorNeumann, Todden_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRetailing is the third largest segment of the American economy. It is unique among many sectors of the economy because virtually every American is a daily customer. Despite this important role, few economists have studied the fascinating changes that have occurred in this industry. This dissertation explores what, when, and why changes occurred in the industry during the 20th Century. The period between 1900--1930 is identified as a key point when two new demand-side consumer technologies, the automobile and radio, fueled the beginnings of a retail revolution. The most important of these innovations was the automobile. Unlike typical supply-side technological innovations that are implemented by the firm, the car was a technology that the consumer was left to adopt. Yet, by lowering local travel costs, it changed access to stores in a variety of ways and like supply side innovations the car profoundly affected the way stores produced the retail service.In the process the size of retail stores increased dramatically. The reduction in the number of stores and the increase in population meant stores were not locating as close to the average consumer as in the past. Stores began to offer a selection of products unheard of at the turn of the century. Not only did they offer more brands of each product, but they also broadened the selection of different products. Corporate-owned chain stores started to supplant the independent retailer. Finally, retail workers became more specialized, and a smaller share of the workforce directly interacted with the customer.This dissertation characterizes these changes and quantifies the impact that new consumer technologies had on the size, number, and labor intensity of retail stores.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFishback, Price Ven_US
dc.contributor.chairFishback, Price Ven_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFlores-Lagunes, Alfonsoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOaxaca, Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLibecap, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1678en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356724en_US
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