Interface Rhetoric, or A Theory for Interface Analysis: Principles from Modern Imagetext Media -- Late 18th Century to Present

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194179
Title:
Interface Rhetoric, or A Theory for Interface Analysis: Principles from Modern Imagetext Media -- Late 18th Century to Present
Author:
Neill, Frederick Vance
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study sought to determine the principles of interface rhetoric through a review of the relevant history and theory involved in imagetext media. Defining interface as the surface that limits the view of an artifact’s content, it focuses on the media of the illustrated book, comics, and the video game, particularly artifacts of those media inspired by the content of Lewis Carroll’s Alice books. Methodologically, it used the history of aesthetics and technology related to imagetext and the theories of these media in order to discern the rhetorical principles of interface distinctive to each medium. It takes the perspective of W. J. T. Mitchell’s concept of "imagetext," Umberto Eco’s sense of semiotics, Maurice Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of perception, and Don Ihde's phenomenology of technology in its analysis of the media’s artifacts. The results of the analyses are a group of rhetorical principles for each medium that explain the operation of logos, pathos, and ethos in each medium’s interface. The explanations refer to Wayne Booth’s “implied author” and Kenneth Burke’s "terminological screens." In the final analysis, this study argues for understanding the relative ubiquity of imagetext in media stemming from the 1830s to present. It takes the stance that changes in aesthetics and technology enabled the rise of imagetext interfaces and the media that had them. More importantly, it formulates the architectonic principles of interface rhetoric regardless of the specific media.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
comics; illustrated books; imagetext; interface; technology; video games
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
McAllister, Ken

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleInterface Rhetoric, or A Theory for Interface Analysis: Principles from Modern Imagetext Media -- Late 18th Century to Presenten_US
dc.creatorNeill, Frederick Vanceen_US
dc.contributor.authorNeill, Frederick Vanceen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study sought to determine the principles of interface rhetoric through a review of the relevant history and theory involved in imagetext media. Defining interface as the surface that limits the view of an artifact’s content, it focuses on the media of the illustrated book, comics, and the video game, particularly artifacts of those media inspired by the content of Lewis Carroll’s Alice books. Methodologically, it used the history of aesthetics and technology related to imagetext and the theories of these media in order to discern the rhetorical principles of interface distinctive to each medium. It takes the perspective of W. J. T. Mitchell’s concept of "imagetext," Umberto Eco’s sense of semiotics, Maurice Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of perception, and Don Ihde's phenomenology of technology in its analysis of the media’s artifacts. The results of the analyses are a group of rhetorical principles for each medium that explain the operation of logos, pathos, and ethos in each medium’s interface. The explanations refer to Wayne Booth’s “implied author” and Kenneth Burke’s "terminological screens." In the final analysis, this study argues for understanding the relative ubiquity of imagetext in media stemming from the 1830s to present. It takes the stance that changes in aesthetics and technology enabled the rise of imagetext interfaces and the media that had them. More importantly, it formulates the architectonic principles of interface rhetoric regardless of the specific media.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcomicsen_US
dc.subjectillustrated booksen_US
dc.subjectimagetexten_US
dc.subjectinterfaceen_US
dc.subjecttechnologyen_US
dc.subjectvideo gamesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMcAllister, Kenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcAllister, Kenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZimmermann, Karenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10626en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753365en_US
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