Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194150
Title:
Epitaxy of Crystal Monolayers
Author:
Murdaugh, Anne E.
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Epitaxial growth, or the oriented growth of a crystalline monolayer on an ordered substrate, appears in a wide range of systems and applications, from novel device fabrication to freshwater remediation. Despite this, methodical studies of the phenomenon are rare, and the mechanisms governing epitaxial growth are poorly understood. This investigation employs AFM techniques to monitor the epitaxial growth of ion crystal systems at the initial stages of growth. By using systems with well-known physical properties, we are able to relate growth modes to two key parameters, crystal lattice mismatch, Δr/r₀, and affinity between the overgrowth and the substrate ions, ξ. We found wetting growth occurs for systems in which Δr/r₀ is expansive (overgrowth lattice must expand to accommodate substrate) or mildly compressive (overgrowth compresses to accommodate substrate). Additionally, a strong affinity between the substrate and overgrowth ions, in combination with an expansive system, allows for epitaxial growth from undersaturated solutions. We also have observed several instances where the lateral force contrast on the growing film exhibits a strong dependence on the time of exposure to the growth solution and on the driving force for growth (solute concentration). We present results for three epitaxial growth systems in aqueous solutions: CaSO₃ on CaCO₃, PbSO₄ on BaSO₄, and BaSO₃ on BaSO₄. Chemically and topographically identical regions grown at higher concentrations exhibit higher friction than regions grown at lower concentrations. These observations suggest that epitaxial growth occurs by a fast condensation step incorporating a high defect density.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
atomic force microscopy; crystal growth; Epitaxy; lateral force microscopy; minerals
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Physics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Manne, Srinivas
Committee Chair:
Manne, Srinivas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleEpitaxy of Crystal Monolayersen_US
dc.creatorMurdaugh, Anne E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurdaugh, Anne E.en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEpitaxial growth, or the oriented growth of a crystalline monolayer on an ordered substrate, appears in a wide range of systems and applications, from novel device fabrication to freshwater remediation. Despite this, methodical studies of the phenomenon are rare, and the mechanisms governing epitaxial growth are poorly understood. This investigation employs AFM techniques to monitor the epitaxial growth of ion crystal systems at the initial stages of growth. By using systems with well-known physical properties, we are able to relate growth modes to two key parameters, crystal lattice mismatch, Δr/r₀, and affinity between the overgrowth and the substrate ions, ξ. We found wetting growth occurs for systems in which Δr/r₀ is expansive (overgrowth lattice must expand to accommodate substrate) or mildly compressive (overgrowth compresses to accommodate substrate). Additionally, a strong affinity between the substrate and overgrowth ions, in combination with an expansive system, allows for epitaxial growth from undersaturated solutions. We also have observed several instances where the lateral force contrast on the growing film exhibits a strong dependence on the time of exposure to the growth solution and on the driving force for growth (solute concentration). We present results for three epitaxial growth systems in aqueous solutions: CaSO₃ on CaCO₃, PbSO₄ on BaSO₄, and BaSO₃ on BaSO₄. Chemically and topographically identical regions grown at higher concentrations exhibit higher friction than regions grown at lower concentrations. These observations suggest that epitaxial growth occurs by a fast condensation step incorporating a high defect density.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectatomic force microscopyen_US
dc.subjectcrystal growthen_US
dc.subjectEpitaxyen_US
dc.subjectlateral force microscopyen_US
dc.subjectmineralsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorManne, Srinivasen_US
dc.contributor.chairManne, Srinivasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberManne, Srinivasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMuzumdar, Sumiten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCheu, Elliotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHsieh, Ke Chiangen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKessler, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10563en_US
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