The Bile Acid, Deoxycholic Acid, Modulates IGF-IR Function in Colon Cancer Cells

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194122
Title:
The Bile Acid, Deoxycholic Acid, Modulates IGF-IR Function in Colon Cancer Cells
Author:
Morgan, Sherif
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Deoxycholic acid (DCA) is a secondary bile acid postulated to be involved in the etiology and the progression of colorectal cancer, but its specific mechanisms are not fully understood. DCA has been shown to induce apoptosis allowing selection for apoptosis-resistant cells, which highlights the importance of understanding the mechanisms of action of DCA. Previously, it has been demonstrated that DCA perturbs the plasma membrane, leading to the activation of receptor tyrosine kinases. Because the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-IR), a receptor tyrosine kinase, is demonstrated to play a significant role in protecting colorectal cancer cells from apoptosis, we hypothesized that DCA modulates IGF-IR functions in colorectal cancer cells. We demonstrated that DCA induced the dynamin-dependent endocytosis of IGF-IR through both clathrin-mediated and caveolin-1-dependent mechanisms. Endocytosis of IGF-IR sensitized cells to DCA-induced apoptosis, which demonstrated that IGF-IR played a role in protecting cells against DCA-induced apoptosis. Since DCA-induced endocytosis of IGF-IR was determined to be a caveolin-1 dependent process, caveolin-1 knockdown in HCT116 (HCT116-Cav1-AS) prevented the DCA-mediated endocytosis of IGF-IR. However, we observed an increased sensitivity of DCA-induced apoptosis in the Cav1-AS cells. This suggested that caveolin-1 knockdown altered the plasma membrane dynamics such that although IGF-IR was maintained at the plasma membrane, it facilitated a pro-apoptotic signal. We demonstrated that DCA induced the activation of the pro-apoptotic p38 signaling pathway in HCT116-Cav1-AS, but not in HCT116-Mock, via IGF-IR. Inhibition of both the IGF-IR and p38 independently in HCT116-Cav1-AS significantly decreased their sensitivity to DCA-induced apoptosis. These observations demonstrated that, in a caveolin-1 dependent manner, IGF-IR played a dynamic role in the DCA-mediated apoptosis. Finally, we provided preliminary evidence demonstrating that autophagy played a central role in protecting DCA-resistant cells from DCA-induced apoptosis.Since resistance to DCA also confers apoptosis-resistance, understanding the mechanisms that lead to or prevent DCA-induced cell death is significant, since they can lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies to sensitize apoptosis-resistant colorectal cancer cells to undergo cell death.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
apoptosis; bile acids; colon cancer; deoxycholic acid; insulin-like growth factor-I receptor
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Cancer Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Bile Acid, Deoxycholic Acid, Modulates IGF-IR Function in Colon Cancer Cellsen_US
dc.creatorMorgan, Sherifen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Sherifen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDeoxycholic acid (DCA) is a secondary bile acid postulated to be involved in the etiology and the progression of colorectal cancer, but its specific mechanisms are not fully understood. DCA has been shown to induce apoptosis allowing selection for apoptosis-resistant cells, which highlights the importance of understanding the mechanisms of action of DCA. Previously, it has been demonstrated that DCA perturbs the plasma membrane, leading to the activation of receptor tyrosine kinases. Because the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-IR), a receptor tyrosine kinase, is demonstrated to play a significant role in protecting colorectal cancer cells from apoptosis, we hypothesized that DCA modulates IGF-IR functions in colorectal cancer cells. We demonstrated that DCA induced the dynamin-dependent endocytosis of IGF-IR through both clathrin-mediated and caveolin-1-dependent mechanisms. Endocytosis of IGF-IR sensitized cells to DCA-induced apoptosis, which demonstrated that IGF-IR played a role in protecting cells against DCA-induced apoptosis. Since DCA-induced endocytosis of IGF-IR was determined to be a caveolin-1 dependent process, caveolin-1 knockdown in HCT116 (HCT116-Cav1-AS) prevented the DCA-mediated endocytosis of IGF-IR. However, we observed an increased sensitivity of DCA-induced apoptosis in the Cav1-AS cells. This suggested that caveolin-1 knockdown altered the plasma membrane dynamics such that although IGF-IR was maintained at the plasma membrane, it facilitated a pro-apoptotic signal. We demonstrated that DCA induced the activation of the pro-apoptotic p38 signaling pathway in HCT116-Cav1-AS, but not in HCT116-Mock, via IGF-IR. Inhibition of both the IGF-IR and p38 independently in HCT116-Cav1-AS significantly decreased their sensitivity to DCA-induced apoptosis. These observations demonstrated that, in a caveolin-1 dependent manner, IGF-IR played a dynamic role in the DCA-mediated apoptosis. Finally, we provided preliminary evidence demonstrating that autophagy played a central role in protecting DCA-resistant cells from DCA-induced apoptosis.Since resistance to DCA also confers apoptosis-resistance, understanding the mechanisms that lead to or prevent DCA-induced cell death is significant, since they can lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies to sensitize apoptosis-resistant colorectal cancer cells to undergo cell death.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectapoptosisen_US
dc.subjectbile acidsen_US
dc.subjectcolon canceren_US
dc.subjectdeoxycholic aciden_US
dc.subjectinsulin-like growth factor-I receptoren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCancer Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMeuillet, Emmanuelle J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBernstein, Harrisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBowden, George T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGerner, Eugene W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMartinez, Jesse D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10437en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752067en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.