Mapping Human Dimensions of Small-scale Fisheries in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194118
Title:
Mapping Human Dimensions of Small-scale Fisheries in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico
Author:
Moreno-Baez, Marcia
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recurrent crises due to overexploitation of fishery resources have been among the biggest natural resource management failures of the 20th century. This problem has both biological and socio-political elements and understanding of human dimensions represents a key step toward the formulation of sound management guidelines for natural resources. One of the strategies proposed to understand human dimensions is through the use of local knowledge. Integrating local peoples' knowledge with scientific research and data analysis, could aid in the design of fisheries management strategies in a cost-effective and participatory way.I introduce an approach to incorporating fishers' local knowledge at a large, regional scale. I focused on the spatial and temporal distribution of fishing activities from 17 communities in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico. Participatory mapping (maps produced by local fishers) through a rapid appraisal (survey methodology) were used to identify the spatial and temporal dimensions of fishing activities. A geographic information system was used to generate 764 map layers used for a preliminary analysis of rapid-appraisal spatial data. Post-survey workshops with fishers were organized to facilitate an internal validation of spatial information using geographic information system software. We characterized the information based on fishing communities, fishing methods, target species and spawning sites. We also applied spatial analysis techniques to understand the relative importance and use of fishing grounds, fishing seasons and the influence that fishing communities have over the region. This dissertation addressed the problem of integrating the human dimensions of small-scale fisheries using geospatial tools and local knowledge (LK) - data collection, integration, internal validation, analysis and access - into a multidisciplinary research to support decision making in natural resource planning for small-scale fisheries management and conservation in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Community Mapping; Gulf of California; Mexico; Local Knowledge; Small-scale Fisheries
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Shaw, William W.; Orr, Barron Joseph

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleMapping Human Dimensions of Small-scale Fisheries in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexicoen_US
dc.creatorMoreno-Baez, Marciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoreno-Baez, Marciaen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecurrent crises due to overexploitation of fishery resources have been among the biggest natural resource management failures of the 20th century. This problem has both biological and socio-political elements and understanding of human dimensions represents a key step toward the formulation of sound management guidelines for natural resources. One of the strategies proposed to understand human dimensions is through the use of local knowledge. Integrating local peoples' knowledge with scientific research and data analysis, could aid in the design of fisheries management strategies in a cost-effective and participatory way.I introduce an approach to incorporating fishers' local knowledge at a large, regional scale. I focused on the spatial and temporal distribution of fishing activities from 17 communities in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico. Participatory mapping (maps produced by local fishers) through a rapid appraisal (survey methodology) were used to identify the spatial and temporal dimensions of fishing activities. A geographic information system was used to generate 764 map layers used for a preliminary analysis of rapid-appraisal spatial data. Post-survey workshops with fishers were organized to facilitate an internal validation of spatial information using geographic information system software. We characterized the information based on fishing communities, fishing methods, target species and spawning sites. We also applied spatial analysis techniques to understand the relative importance and use of fishing grounds, fishing seasons and the influence that fishing communities have over the region. This dissertation addressed the problem of integrating the human dimensions of small-scale fisheries using geospatial tools and local knowledge (LK) - data collection, integration, internal validation, analysis and access - into a multidisciplinary research to support decision making in natural resource planning for small-scale fisheries management and conservation in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCommunity Mappingen_US
dc.subjectGulf of Californiaen_US
dc.subjectMexicoen_US
dc.subjectLocal Knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectSmall-scale Fisheriesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairShaw, William W.en_US
dc.contributor.chairOrr, Barron Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, David Phillipen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcGuire, Thomas R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10880en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753800en_US
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