Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194109
Title:
Deposition of Bacteria from Sessile Drops
Author:
Baughman, Kyle
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation reports on the discovery of a new method of patterning bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1) on a surface using a drying sessile drop. This work identifies bacterial suspension age and the length of time mica is exposed to the laboratory atmosphere as the key parameters which impact the behavior of the sessile drop and the resulting residue. Possible origins of mica aging and bacterial suspension aging are discussed in light of the literature and the experimental conditions. The residue area and the fraction of the residue area on which substantial bacteria and salt deposits remained after the drying of the drop (fill-in fraction) were measured via analysis of optical micrographs. In general, smaller residues are more filled in. For fresh bacterial suspensions, and short mica exposure times, the residue covers the largest area and is characterized by rings formed during discrete depinning events as the solvent evaporates. As the exposure time increases and the mica surface slowly picks up contaminants from the atmosphere, the drop residue shrinks in size and bacteria are deposited in a regular cellular film in the interior of the drop residue. The fraction of the interior area covered by the cellular film is well correlated with the mica exposure time. For sufficiently aged bacterial suspensions, residues are small and more filled-in than residues formed from fresh suspensions on similarly aged mica. In addition, the interior deposition pattern transitions from a cellular film characteristic of fresh suspensions to a cracked carpet pattern for aged suspensions. Suspension aging related changes in the residues are attributed to accumulation of organic materials such as DNA, RNA, proteins, and other bacterial components in the suspension. The suspension aging process is also observed to be at least partially dependent on ventilation of the suspension during aging.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
bacteria; cellular film; colloid; drop; patterning; sessile
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Materials Science & Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Uhlmann, Donald R.; Curry, Joan E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDeposition of Bacteria from Sessile Dropsen_US
dc.creatorBaughman, Kyleen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaughman, Kyleen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation reports on the discovery of a new method of patterning bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1) on a surface using a drying sessile drop. This work identifies bacterial suspension age and the length of time mica is exposed to the laboratory atmosphere as the key parameters which impact the behavior of the sessile drop and the resulting residue. Possible origins of mica aging and bacterial suspension aging are discussed in light of the literature and the experimental conditions. The residue area and the fraction of the residue area on which substantial bacteria and salt deposits remained after the drying of the drop (fill-in fraction) were measured via analysis of optical micrographs. In general, smaller residues are more filled in. For fresh bacterial suspensions, and short mica exposure times, the residue covers the largest area and is characterized by rings formed during discrete depinning events as the solvent evaporates. As the exposure time increases and the mica surface slowly picks up contaminants from the atmosphere, the drop residue shrinks in size and bacteria are deposited in a regular cellular film in the interior of the drop residue. The fraction of the interior area covered by the cellular film is well correlated with the mica exposure time. For sufficiently aged bacterial suspensions, residues are small and more filled-in than residues formed from fresh suspensions on similarly aged mica. In addition, the interior deposition pattern transitions from a cellular film characteristic of fresh suspensions to a cracked carpet pattern for aged suspensions. Suspension aging related changes in the residues are attributed to accumulation of organic materials such as DNA, RNA, proteins, and other bacterial components in the suspension. The suspension aging process is also observed to be at least partially dependent on ventilation of the suspension during aging.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectbacteriaen_US
dc.subjectcellular filmen_US
dc.subjectcolloiden_US
dc.subjectdropen_US
dc.subjectpatterningen_US
dc.subjectsessileen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science & Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairUhlmann, Donald R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairCurry, Joan E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSeraphin, Supapanen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10272en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750881en_US
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