Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194099
Title:
Studies in Aerosol Drug Formulation, Analysis, and Modeling
Author:
Mogalian, Erik
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A recently mandated change in the use of pharmaceutical propellants spurred the development and reevaluation of aerosolized pharmaceuticals. Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) propellants were commonly used in pressurized metered dose inhalers (MDIs), but were unfortunately linked to the depletion of the ozone layer. As such, a search for new propellants was initiated and ultimately resulted in the implementation of hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellants in MDIs. These HFA propellants however demonstrated significantly different properties than CFCs and necessitated a considerable amount of reformulation efforts. Not only did HFAs demonstrate different physiochemical properties, but in some cases these differences necessitated reengineering of the delivery device. Unfortunately HFA propellants are considered greenhouse gasses, albeit to a lesser degree than CFCs, so the development of alternate delivery methods has been ongoing. One delivery method that has received significant attention and resources is dry powder inhalers (DPIs). DPIs are a propellant-free alternative to aerosolized drug delivery, and demonstrate some advantages and disadvantages compared to the use of MDIs and nebulizers.In addition to the modernization of pharmaceutical agents, excipients, and delivery devices, technological advances have allowed for different and/or improved characterization of pharmaceutical aerosols. Particle size characteristics of aerosols are the primary physical measure examined and are relevant to ensure proper and reproducible drug delivery to the lung. Likewise, chemical analysis of the pharmaceutical agent is extremely important for pharmaceutical development and monitoring, including solubility determination, stability monitoring, and ultimately, dose emitted. Because many limitations exist in characterization however, and because experimental means can be costly with regard to labor and materials, prediction of aerosol performance characteristics based on formulation and device variables are valuable.Previous work predicting the performance of solution based MDIs has opened the door for improved prediction of suspension based MDI systems. Suspension aerosol prediction has been examined in the past, but additional information is now available to more appropriately model suspension MDI systems that include polydisperse drug material and emit polydisperse droplets.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
aerosol; inhaler; modeling; formulation; analysis; suspension modeling
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Pharmaceutical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Myrdal, Paul B
Committee Chair:
Myrdal, Paul B

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleStudies in Aerosol Drug Formulation, Analysis, and Modelingen_US
dc.creatorMogalian, Eriken_US
dc.contributor.authorMogalian, Eriken_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA recently mandated change in the use of pharmaceutical propellants spurred the development and reevaluation of aerosolized pharmaceuticals. Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) propellants were commonly used in pressurized metered dose inhalers (MDIs), but were unfortunately linked to the depletion of the ozone layer. As such, a search for new propellants was initiated and ultimately resulted in the implementation of hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellants in MDIs. These HFA propellants however demonstrated significantly different properties than CFCs and necessitated a considerable amount of reformulation efforts. Not only did HFAs demonstrate different physiochemical properties, but in some cases these differences necessitated reengineering of the delivery device. Unfortunately HFA propellants are considered greenhouse gasses, albeit to a lesser degree than CFCs, so the development of alternate delivery methods has been ongoing. One delivery method that has received significant attention and resources is dry powder inhalers (DPIs). DPIs are a propellant-free alternative to aerosolized drug delivery, and demonstrate some advantages and disadvantages compared to the use of MDIs and nebulizers.In addition to the modernization of pharmaceutical agents, excipients, and delivery devices, technological advances have allowed for different and/or improved characterization of pharmaceutical aerosols. Particle size characteristics of aerosols are the primary physical measure examined and are relevant to ensure proper and reproducible drug delivery to the lung. Likewise, chemical analysis of the pharmaceutical agent is extremely important for pharmaceutical development and monitoring, including solubility determination, stability monitoring, and ultimately, dose emitted. Because many limitations exist in characterization however, and because experimental means can be costly with regard to labor and materials, prediction of aerosol performance characteristics based on formulation and device variables are valuable.Previous work predicting the performance of solution based MDIs has opened the door for improved prediction of suspension based MDI systems. Suspension aerosol prediction has been examined in the past, but additional information is now available to more appropriately model suspension MDI systems that include polydisperse drug material and emit polydisperse droplets.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectaerosolen_US
dc.subjectinhaleren_US
dc.subjectmodelingen_US
dc.subjectformulationen_US
dc.subjectanalysisen_US
dc.subjectsuspension modelingen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmaceutical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMyrdal, Paul Ben_US
dc.contributor.chairMyrdal, Paul Ben_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYalkowsky, Samuelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMayersohn, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2691en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749698en_US
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