Remote Sensing Of Thermally Induced Activity On Io And Mars

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194068
Title:
Remote Sensing Of Thermally Induced Activity On Io And Mars
Author:
Milazzo, Moses Pollen
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
My dissertation details the work I have done related to remote sensing of thermal activityon Io and thermal remote sensing used in the search for oases on Mars. At Io, I studiedtwo volcanoes, Tvashtar and Prometheus and their thermal activity. At Mars, I investigatedsuggestions of a possible oasis in one of the youngest volcanic regions, Cerberus Fossaeand nearby areas of SE Elysium.Tvashtar was the site of the first high-spatial-resolution observation of an extraterrestriallava curtain. The Tvashtar complex was also the site of a large, confined eruption a fewmonths after the fissure eruption. I discuss the work involved in estimating the brightnesstemperatures and power output of both eruptions as seen by the Galileo SSI. I also discusscooling and eruption-style models and their application to Tvashtar. In every geometricallycorrect observation of Prometheus, we have seen a 100 km tall SO2 gas and dust plumeabove its flow field. This plume and field migrated ~80 km between the Voyager and Galileo eras. I describe the work I performed in modeling the plume's creation as lava-volatileinteractions at the flow fronts.My Mars research entailed the search for thermal systems and constraints on nearsurfacewater ice in an equatorial region that contains some of the youngest lava flows onMars. This region, SE Elysium, also shows evidence of contemporaneous water and lava. Life as we know it requires a source of energy and liquid water, so a geologically youngregion containing both water and energy is an obvious place to study. I show, however, thatthe recent suggestions of extant near-surface water ice and possible endogenic energy escapeare not necessary, and that the thermal imaging of the region requires rock rather thanwater ice near the surface. I also show that the current instruments at Mars are insufficientfor the remote discovery of thermal reservoirs and then discuss some possible remedies.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Volcanism; Io; Mars; Remote Sensing; Galileo; THEMIS
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Planetary Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McEwen, Alfred S
Committee Chair:
McEwen, Alfred S

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleRemote Sensing Of Thermally Induced Activity On Io And Marsen_US
dc.creatorMilazzo, Moses Pollenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMilazzo, Moses Pollenen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMy dissertation details the work I have done related to remote sensing of thermal activityon Io and thermal remote sensing used in the search for oases on Mars. At Io, I studiedtwo volcanoes, Tvashtar and Prometheus and their thermal activity. At Mars, I investigatedsuggestions of a possible oasis in one of the youngest volcanic regions, Cerberus Fossaeand nearby areas of SE Elysium.Tvashtar was the site of the first high-spatial-resolution observation of an extraterrestriallava curtain. The Tvashtar complex was also the site of a large, confined eruption a fewmonths after the fissure eruption. I discuss the work involved in estimating the brightnesstemperatures and power output of both eruptions as seen by the Galileo SSI. I also discusscooling and eruption-style models and their application to Tvashtar. In every geometricallycorrect observation of Prometheus, we have seen a 100 km tall SO2 gas and dust plumeabove its flow field. This plume and field migrated ~80 km between the Voyager and Galileo eras. I describe the work I performed in modeling the plume's creation as lava-volatileinteractions at the flow fronts.My Mars research entailed the search for thermal systems and constraints on nearsurfacewater ice in an equatorial region that contains some of the youngest lava flows onMars. This region, SE Elysium, also shows evidence of contemporaneous water and lava. Life as we know it requires a source of energy and liquid water, so a geologically youngregion containing both water and energy is an obvious place to study. I show, however, thatthe recent suggestions of extant near-surface water ice and possible endogenic energy escapeare not necessary, and that the thermal imaging of the region requires rock rather thanwater ice near the surface. I also show that the current instruments at Mars are insufficientfor the remote discovery of thermal reservoirs and then discuss some possible remedies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectVolcanismen_US
dc.subjectIoen_US
dc.subjectMarsen_US
dc.subjectRemote Sensingen_US
dc.subjectGalileoen_US
dc.subjectTHEMISen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlanetary Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcEwen, Alfred Sen_US
dc.contributor.chairMcEwen, Alfred Sen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcEwen, Alfred S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChase, Clement G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKeszthelyi, Laszlo P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRichardson, Randall M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTurtle, Elizabeth P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1363en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355253en_US
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