Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194065
Title:
School Psychologists' Preferences on Response to Intervention
Author:
Mike, Kristen Lynne
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
As a result of the reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, 2004), Response to Intervention (RTI) became a legal and acceptable basis for determining special education eligibility. While there may be evidence that RTI has had positive effects on the prereferral process for special education in some schools, there still remains controversy in the field of school psychology about many aspects of RTI, in particular the use of RTI in the identification process for children with learning disabilities. The purpose of current questionnaire study was (a) to determine school psychologists' preferences on the use of RTI in both the prereferral and the identification process of students with learning disabilities, (b) to investigate the implementation process in school systems from school psychologists' perspectives, and (c) to examine the role of the school psychologist in RTI implementation efforts and RTI activities.Data were collected from 41 members of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). Each participant completed a survey, which related to the above purposes, and responded to items using a 5-point Likert scale. Results indicated that sampled school psychologists generally responded favorably to RTI as a prereferral method, but varied on their level of agreement on using RTI for diagnostic purposes. Most respondents agreed that RTI should not be the sole criteria for determining a learning disability and that a comprehensive evaluation should take place including standardized cognitive and academic testing. Identified benefits to implementing RTI were: interventions for struggling students occur earlier, improved instruction for all students, greater collaboration between general and special education, and improved method of identifying at risk groups/individuals. Identified challenges to implementing RTI were: need for professional development, lack of teacher preparation, lack of support staff to implement interventions, and intervention fidelity. A majority of respondents agreed that the school psychologist's role should include various RTI activities and in particular RTI activities related to data interpretation, consultation, supervising, and training.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Attitudes; Learning Disabilities; Preferences; Response to Intervention; Roles; School Psychologists
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education & Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mishra, Shitala
Committee Chair:
Mishra, Shitala

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSchool Psychologists' Preferences on Response to Interventionen_US
dc.creatorMike, Kristen Lynneen_US
dc.contributor.authorMike, Kristen Lynneen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs a result of the reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, 2004), Response to Intervention (RTI) became a legal and acceptable basis for determining special education eligibility. While there may be evidence that RTI has had positive effects on the prereferral process for special education in some schools, there still remains controversy in the field of school psychology about many aspects of RTI, in particular the use of RTI in the identification process for children with learning disabilities. The purpose of current questionnaire study was (a) to determine school psychologists' preferences on the use of RTI in both the prereferral and the identification process of students with learning disabilities, (b) to investigate the implementation process in school systems from school psychologists' perspectives, and (c) to examine the role of the school psychologist in RTI implementation efforts and RTI activities.Data were collected from 41 members of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). Each participant completed a survey, which related to the above purposes, and responded to items using a 5-point Likert scale. Results indicated that sampled school psychologists generally responded favorably to RTI as a prereferral method, but varied on their level of agreement on using RTI for diagnostic purposes. Most respondents agreed that RTI should not be the sole criteria for determining a learning disability and that a comprehensive evaluation should take place including standardized cognitive and academic testing. Identified benefits to implementing RTI were: interventions for struggling students occur earlier, improved instruction for all students, greater collaboration between general and special education, and improved method of identifying at risk groups/individuals. Identified challenges to implementing RTI were: need for professional development, lack of teacher preparation, lack of support staff to implement interventions, and intervention fidelity. A majority of respondents agreed that the school psychologist's role should include various RTI activities and in particular RTI activities related to data interpretation, consultation, supervising, and training.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAttitudesen_US
dc.subjectLearning Disabilitiesen_US
dc.subjectPreferencesen_US
dc.subjectResponse to Interventionen_US
dc.subjectRolesen_US
dc.subjectSchool Psychologistsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education & Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMishra, Shitalaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMishra, Shitalaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPerfect, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMather, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFletcher, Todden_US
dc.identifier.proquest10886en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753802en_US
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