In Pursuit of Literacy: Institutional Literacy and the Teaching of First-Year Writing

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194055
Title:
In Pursuit of Literacy: Institutional Literacy and the Teaching of First-Year Writing
Author:
Merz, Stephanie
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is an auto-ethnographic account of my curriculum in first-year writing that promotes institutional literacy and examines student responses to it. I frame my research with New Literacy Studies (NLS) in order to highlight the connections between the literate practices of students and larger social, cultural, economic, and ideological contexts. Not only is this helpful for my own understanding of how, when, and why literacy learning occurs, but NLS encourages a critical approach to literacy learning, one that I want my students to adopt as well. Because I was interested in student responses to my curriculum, I conducted interviews with students about their reasons for coming to college, their attitudes towards college, their life goals, as well as their backgrounds. My analysis of student interviews reveals student perceptions of self-efficacy and agency are largely situated along socioeconomic lines. The method of ethnography enabled me to see the exceptions and more nuanced groups of students, which allowed me to complicate the intersections of class and literacy learning.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Miller, Thomas P.
Committee Chair:
Miller, Thomas P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleIn Pursuit of Literacy: Institutional Literacy and the Teaching of First-Year Writingen_US
dc.creatorMerz, Stephanieen_US
dc.contributor.authorMerz, Stephanieen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is an auto-ethnographic account of my curriculum in first-year writing that promotes institutional literacy and examines student responses to it. I frame my research with New Literacy Studies (NLS) in order to highlight the connections between the literate practices of students and larger social, cultural, economic, and ideological contexts. Not only is this helpful for my own understanding of how, when, and why literacy learning occurs, but NLS encourages a critical approach to literacy learning, one that I want my students to adopt as well. Because I was interested in student responses to my curriculum, I conducted interviews with students about their reasons for coming to college, their attitudes towards college, their life goals, as well as their backgrounds. My analysis of student interviews reveals student perceptions of self-efficacy and agency are largely situated along socioeconomic lines. The method of ethnography enabled me to see the exceptions and more nuanced groups of students, which allowed me to complicate the intersections of class and literacy learning.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Thomas P.en_US
dc.contributor.chairMiller, Thomas P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCheslock, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHall, Anne-Marieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhite, Edward M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11141en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752260998en_US
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