Physiological Measures of Affective Chronometry during Habitual and Voluntary Use of Emotion Regulation Strategies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194046
Title:
Physiological Measures of Affective Chronometry during Habitual and Voluntary Use of Emotion Regulation Strategies
Author:
Menchola, Marisa
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Emotions are currently conceptualized as ongoing temporal processes. Consistent with this view, an important target of attempts at emotion regulation are the temporal characteristics of an emotional response. The process model of emotion regulation (Gross, 1998a) distinguishes between antecedent- and response-focused emotion regulation strategies, depending on when during the unfolding emotional response they act. Two strategies that exemplify this distinction are cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression. The present study explored the effects of the interaction between habitual engagement in reappraisal and suppression and their voluntary manipulation. Using a between-subjects design, 122 participants selected based on their self-reported habitual emotion regulation strategy (reappraisal, suppression, or both strategies without clear preference for one over the other) received instructions to engage in reappraisal, suppression, or merely watch emotion-eliciting images. Chronometric analyses of emotion-related psychophysiological measures (startle reflex modulation, corrugator electromyography, and skin conductance) were conducted in order to further characterize the differences in the time course of these two strategies during the down-regulation of negative emotion. As expected, instructions to reappraise resulted in lower unpleasantness and arousal ratings, as well as less overall corrugator electromyographic activity, compared to instructions to suppress. No differences between instruction conditions were observed on startle reflex or skin conductance. Moreover, no differences were observed in the chronometry of any of the physiological measures. Habitual emotion regulation style had no direct effect on any of the dependent variables, and it did not interact with instruction condition. The implications for the study of the chronometry of emotion regulation are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.
Committee Chair:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePhysiological Measures of Affective Chronometry during Habitual and Voluntary Use of Emotion Regulation Strategiesen_US
dc.creatorMenchola, Marisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMenchola, Marisaen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEmotions are currently conceptualized as ongoing temporal processes. Consistent with this view, an important target of attempts at emotion regulation are the temporal characteristics of an emotional response. The process model of emotion regulation (Gross, 1998a) distinguishes between antecedent- and response-focused emotion regulation strategies, depending on when during the unfolding emotional response they act. Two strategies that exemplify this distinction are cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression. The present study explored the effects of the interaction between habitual engagement in reappraisal and suppression and their voluntary manipulation. Using a between-subjects design, 122 participants selected based on their self-reported habitual emotion regulation strategy (reappraisal, suppression, or both strategies without clear preference for one over the other) received instructions to engage in reappraisal, suppression, or merely watch emotion-eliciting images. Chronometric analyses of emotion-related psychophysiological measures (startle reflex modulation, corrugator electromyography, and skin conductance) were conducted in order to further characterize the differences in the time course of these two strategies during the down-regulation of negative emotion. As expected, instructions to reappraise resulted in lower unpleasantness and arousal ratings, as well as less overall corrugator electromyographic activity, compared to instructions to suppress. No differences between instruction conditions were observed on startle reflex or skin conductance. Moreover, no differences were observed in the chronometry of any of the physiological measures. Habitual emotion regulation style had no direct effect on any of the dependent variables, and it did not interact with instruction condition. The implications for the study of the chronometry of emotion regulation are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.contributor.chairKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAllen, John J.B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArkowitz, Harold S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSbarra, David A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2392en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748282en_US
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