Policy, Governance and Local Institutions for Biodiversity Conservation in Costa Rica

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194042
Title:
Policy, Governance and Local Institutions for Biodiversity Conservation in Costa Rica
Author:
Basurto, Xavier
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The goal of this dissertation is to advance the theory of common-pool resources in three different but interrelated ways: (1) Common-pool resources theory has identified a number of factors that play an important role on human groups' ability to engage in successful institutional change. However it is still not clear which are their causal relationships on specific contexts. This study looks at the relationship between two of the aforementioned factors: local leadership and local autonomy. It does so in the context of the decentralization of the governance of protected areas for biodiversity conservation in Costa Rica. (2) Historically, common-pool resources theory has paid limited attention to the interactions between local institutions and higher levels of governance. This study incorporates the analysis of cross-scale institutional linkages into the assessment of decentralization reforms in Costa Rica. (3) To do so it incorporates an analytical approach that allows for systematic and rigorous comparisons of small-to-moderate-sized Ns and is apt at handling multiple-causality outcomes. Looking at these issues in the context of the decentralization of biodiversity governance in Costa Rica is relevant because it is the most biodiverse country per unit of area in the world, and during the last twenty years has experimented with decentralization policies to create locally-based institutions for biodiversity conservation. Among my most relevant findings are: (1) that the presence of local leadership is positively related to institutions ability to gain local autonomy from the central government. (2) However, in the context of a class-based society with a strong urban-rural divide, the emergence of local leadership for conservation in rural settings is likely not able to take place by itself without support from within the bureaucratic structure. (3) More diverse are better than less diverse sets of cross-scale linkages in local institutions' ability to gain and maintain local autonomy overtime. (4) Local autonomy can help local institutions increase their potential for biodiversity conservation as long as there are well-defined institutional arrangements in place. Otherwise, local institutions might find themselves pursuing other agendas that might have an unclear relation with biodiversity conservation.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
common-pool resources; biodiversity; Costa Rica; decentralization; Area de Conservacion Guanacaste; ACG
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Management; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schlager, Edella
Committee Chair:
Schlager, Edella

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePolicy, Governance and Local Institutions for Biodiversity Conservation in Costa Ricaen_US
dc.creatorBasurto, Xavieren_US
dc.contributor.authorBasurto, Xavieren_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this dissertation is to advance the theory of common-pool resources in three different but interrelated ways: (1) Common-pool resources theory has identified a number of factors that play an important role on human groups' ability to engage in successful institutional change. However it is still not clear which are their causal relationships on specific contexts. This study looks at the relationship between two of the aforementioned factors: local leadership and local autonomy. It does so in the context of the decentralization of the governance of protected areas for biodiversity conservation in Costa Rica. (2) Historically, common-pool resources theory has paid limited attention to the interactions between local institutions and higher levels of governance. This study incorporates the analysis of cross-scale institutional linkages into the assessment of decentralization reforms in Costa Rica. (3) To do so it incorporates an analytical approach that allows for systematic and rigorous comparisons of small-to-moderate-sized Ns and is apt at handling multiple-causality outcomes. Looking at these issues in the context of the decentralization of biodiversity governance in Costa Rica is relevant because it is the most biodiverse country per unit of area in the world, and during the last twenty years has experimented with decentralization policies to create locally-based institutions for biodiversity conservation. Among my most relevant findings are: (1) that the presence of local leadership is positively related to institutions ability to gain local autonomy from the central government. (2) However, in the context of a class-based society with a strong urban-rural divide, the emergence of local leadership for conservation in rural settings is likely not able to take place by itself without support from within the bureaucratic structure. (3) More diverse are better than less diverse sets of cross-scale linkages in local institutions' ability to gain and maintain local autonomy overtime. (4) Local autonomy can help local institutions increase their potential for biodiversity conservation as long as there are well-defined institutional arrangements in place. Otherwise, local institutions might find themselves pursuing other agendas that might have an unclear relation with biodiversity conservation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcommon-pool resourcesen_US
dc.subjectbiodiversityen_US
dc.subjectCosta Ricaen_US
dc.subjectdecentralizationen_US
dc.subjectArea de Conservacion Guanacasteen_US
dc.subjectACGen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchlager, Edellaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSchlager, Edellaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOstrom, Elinoren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRagin, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansing, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAustin, Dianeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2354en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748234en_US
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