Functional and Effective Connectivity of Effortful Emotion Regulation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194032
Title:
Functional and Effective Connectivity of Effortful Emotion Regulation
Author:
McRae, Kateri Lynne
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Emotion regulation plays an important role in emotional well-being, as well as in the protection against and recovery from mood and anxiety disorders. Previous studies of the functional neuroanatomy of emotion regulation have reported greater activity in prefrontal control-related regions during active regulation. These activations are accompanied by decreases in activity in emotion-responsive regions such as the amygdala and insula. These findings are widely interpreted as consistent with models of cognitive control that implicate top-down, negative influences from prefrontal cortex upon emotion-related processing in other regions. However, no studies to date have used measures of effective connectivity to investigate the likely influence of prefrontal control regions upon emotion-responsive regions in the context of effortful emotion regulation. In the present study, participants alternated between responding naturally to negative emotional stimuli and reinterpreting the negative stimuli with the goal of reducing their experienced negative affect. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure whole-brain blood-oxygen level dependent signal throughout the task. fMRI data were analyzed using partial least squares (PLS) and structural equations modeling (SEM) to test for differences in effective connectivity between natural and regulated emotional responding. Results indicate that three paths significantly distinguish between regulation and non-regulation negative conditions. The path from inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) to anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was significantly less positive during regulation than natural responding. In addition, the reciprocal paths between ACC and insula were more negative during regulation than natural responding. Taken as a whole, these changes in effective connectivity are consistent with assumptions of top-down modulation during effortful emotion regulation. In addition, these changes suggest a pivotal role for the influence of IFG upon ACC and the ACC-insula loop in emotion regulation. The processes represented by these changes and implications for future research are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
fMRI; emotion; regulation; multivariate; statistical modeling
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.
Committee Chair:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFunctional and Effective Connectivity of Effortful Emotion Regulationen_US
dc.creatorMcRae, Kateri Lynneen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcRae, Kateri Lynneen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEmotion regulation plays an important role in emotional well-being, as well as in the protection against and recovery from mood and anxiety disorders. Previous studies of the functional neuroanatomy of emotion regulation have reported greater activity in prefrontal control-related regions during active regulation. These activations are accompanied by decreases in activity in emotion-responsive regions such as the amygdala and insula. These findings are widely interpreted as consistent with models of cognitive control that implicate top-down, negative influences from prefrontal cortex upon emotion-related processing in other regions. However, no studies to date have used measures of effective connectivity to investigate the likely influence of prefrontal control regions upon emotion-responsive regions in the context of effortful emotion regulation. In the present study, participants alternated between responding naturally to negative emotional stimuli and reinterpreting the negative stimuli with the goal of reducing their experienced negative affect. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure whole-brain blood-oxygen level dependent signal throughout the task. fMRI data were analyzed using partial least squares (PLS) and structural equations modeling (SEM) to test for differences in effective connectivity between natural and regulated emotional responding. Results indicate that three paths significantly distinguish between regulation and non-regulation negative conditions. The path from inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) to anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was significantly less positive during regulation than natural responding. In addition, the reciprocal paths between ACC and insula were more negative during regulation than natural responding. Taken as a whole, these changes in effective connectivity are consistent with assumptions of top-down modulation during effortful emotion regulation. In addition, these changes suggest a pivotal role for the influence of IFG upon ACC and the ACC-insula loop in emotion regulation. The processes represented by these changes and implications for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectfMRIen_US
dc.subjectemotionen_US
dc.subjectregulationen_US
dc.subjectmultivariateen_US
dc.subjectstatistical modelingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.contributor.chairKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLane, Richard D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAllen, John J.B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSanfey, Alan G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcIntosh, A. Randalen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2103en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747214en_US
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