Maverick Ethos: The Principles and Practice of PostIdentification Rhetoric

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194022
Title:
Maverick Ethos: The Principles and Practice of PostIdentification Rhetoric
Author:
McKenzie, Charles
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Of all the boundaries that are discussed and argued in critical and rhetorical theory, one of the most central and persistently controversial is the boundary line in the binary Self/other. The dominant rhetorical theories since Aristotle tend to claim that it is by reducing the division in this most fundamental binary that the most efficacious rhetoric is effected; that is, that bringing parties Self and other closer together before argument (or whatever serves as symbol-exchange within the larger act of rhetorical exchange) is most likely to establish the best preconditions for immediately-following symbol-exchange: This act of getting-together is known as Identification. This dissertation introduces the theory of postidentification (postID), which suggests that recognizing, valorizing, and using the division between the parties in rhetorical exchange--not attempting to find, create, and use similarities--often makes for the most efficacious rhetoric, especially when efficacious means transformative. All extant rhetorical theory continues to be based on various interpretations and iterations of the enthymeme and the syllogism that require various levels of Identification and continue to privilege the dominant party in the exchange, that is, Self (or Same or Selfsame, as they appear and act in different contexts). These Identification rhetorics include rhetorics of resistance emerging from feminist, postcolonial, and queer critical theory. All of these extant theories are dependent on some form of Identification, which means that the more Self and other have in common before the symbol exchange--that is, the more like Selfsame other is forced to be--the likelier some one will be persuaded to change a belief or attitude or to cause action. The new rhetorical theory of postidentification uses differences instead of similarities to establish the preconditions for rhetorical exchange. In short, what postID does is push queer theory or GLBT theory to its logical end: If we can have GLBT theory, why not GLBTYUM<<RTOD##55zxto, etc. ad infinitum . . . theory?
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
rhetorical philosophy; radical alterity politics; GLBT; Queer Theory; Language; Reading and Culture; Hermenuetics
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Enos, Theresa J.
Committee Chair:
Enos, Theresa J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleMaverick Ethos: The Principles and Practice of PostIdentification Rhetoricen_US
dc.creatorMcKenzie, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, Charlesen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOf all the boundaries that are discussed and argued in critical and rhetorical theory, one of the most central and persistently controversial is the boundary line in the binary Self/other. The dominant rhetorical theories since Aristotle tend to claim that it is by reducing the division in this most fundamental binary that the most efficacious rhetoric is effected; that is, that bringing parties Self and other closer together before argument (or whatever serves as symbol-exchange within the larger act of rhetorical exchange) is most likely to establish the best preconditions for immediately-following symbol-exchange: This act of getting-together is known as Identification. This dissertation introduces the theory of postidentification (postID), which suggests that recognizing, valorizing, and using the division between the parties in rhetorical exchange--not attempting to find, create, and use similarities--often makes for the most efficacious rhetoric, especially when efficacious means transformative. All extant rhetorical theory continues to be based on various interpretations and iterations of the enthymeme and the syllogism that require various levels of Identification and continue to privilege the dominant party in the exchange, that is, Self (or Same or Selfsame, as they appear and act in different contexts). These Identification rhetorics include rhetorics of resistance emerging from feminist, postcolonial, and queer critical theory. All of these extant theories are dependent on some form of Identification, which means that the more Self and other have in common before the symbol exchange--that is, the more like Selfsame other is forced to be--the likelier some one will be persuaded to change a belief or attitude or to cause action. The new rhetorical theory of postidentification uses differences instead of similarities to establish the preconditions for rhetorical exchange. In short, what postID does is push queer theory or GLBT theory to its logical end: If we can have GLBT theory, why not GLBTYUM<<RTOD##55zxto, etc. ad infinitum . . . theory?en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectrhetorical philosophyen_US
dc.subjectradical alterity politicsen_US
dc.subjectGLBTen_US
dc.subjectQueer Theoryen_US
dc.subjectLanguageen_US
dc.subjectReading and Cultureen_US
dc.subjectHermenueticsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEnos, Theresa J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairEnos, Theresa J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeming, Allisonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWarnock, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1460en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356875en_US
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