Volcanism, Household Archaeology, and Formation Processes in the Zapotitan Valley, El Salvador

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194021
Title:
Volcanism, Household Archaeology, and Formation Processes in the Zapotitan Valley, El Salvador
Author:
McKee, Brian Ross
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Archaeologists have long labored under the implicit assumption that the archaeological record is a direct reflection of past human behaviors. However, numerous cultural and environmental processes intervene between past behaviors and their reconstruction through archaeological inference. This study examines the interface between household archaeology and formation processes through the study of domestic materials from two contemporaneous sites in the Zapotitan Valley of El Salvador that were occupied by people who spoke the same language and belonged to the same regional political system. Ceren was a small village that was occupied for several decades before it was deeply buried by the eruption of Loma Caldera volcano. San Andres was a much larger center that also was affected by several eruptions, but did not experience long-term catastrophic abandonment or exceptional preservation. The research examines the effects of cultural formation processes, including reuse, discard, abandonment, and post-abandonment disturbance processes, and non-cultural formation processes, such as effects of catastrophic volcanic burial, and the effects of plants and animals. It compares the de facto refuse from Ceren with discarded materials from Ceren, and San Andres using the discard equation and methods developed in accumulations research to build a foundation for more generally applicable models to interpret household remains in western El Salvador and throughout Mesoamerica.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
household archaeology; formation processes; Mesoamerican archaeology; El Salvador
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Schiffer, Michael B.; Culbert, T. Patrick

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleVolcanism, Household Archaeology, and Formation Processes in the Zapotitan Valley, El Salvadoren_US
dc.creatorMcKee, Brian Rossen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKee, Brian Rossen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractArchaeologists have long labored under the implicit assumption that the archaeological record is a direct reflection of past human behaviors. However, numerous cultural and environmental processes intervene between past behaviors and their reconstruction through archaeological inference. This study examines the interface between household archaeology and formation processes through the study of domestic materials from two contemporaneous sites in the Zapotitan Valley of El Salvador that were occupied by people who spoke the same language and belonged to the same regional political system. Ceren was a small village that was occupied for several decades before it was deeply buried by the eruption of Loma Caldera volcano. San Andres was a much larger center that also was affected by several eruptions, but did not experience long-term catastrophic abandonment or exceptional preservation. The research examines the effects of cultural formation processes, including reuse, discard, abandonment, and post-abandonment disturbance processes, and non-cultural formation processes, such as effects of catastrophic volcanic burial, and the effects of plants and animals. It compares the de facto refuse from Ceren with discarded materials from Ceren, and San Andres using the discard equation and methods developed in accumulations research to build a foundation for more generally applicable models to interpret household remains in western El Salvador and throughout Mesoamerica.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjecthousehold archaeologyen_US
dc.subjectformation processesen_US
dc.subjectMesoamerican archaeologyen_US
dc.subjectEl Salvadoren_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSchiffer, Michael B.en_US
dc.contributor.chairCulbert, T. Patricken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMills, Barbara J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2186en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747281en_US
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