A Comparison of the Reading Progress of English Language Speakers and Learners, Participating in an Intensive, Explicit, Structured, Phonics-based Program

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194005
Title:
A Comparison of the Reading Progress of English Language Speakers and Learners, Participating in an Intensive, Explicit, Structured, Phonics-based Program
Author:
McCain, Kathleen
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A large body of research supports the use of intensive, explicit, structured, phonics-based programming (IESPP) for achieving positive outcomes for students at-risk for reading failure. Few studies included English language learners. The purpose of this study was to determine whether students participating in IESPP became proficient readers and to identify site characteristics contributing to successful implementation.The sample consisted of 199 third grade students from three schools in a district in the Southwest using IESPP. Participants were assigned to one of four groups: English speakers (n=89), English learners (n=79), English speakers with learning disabilities (LD) (n=13), and English learners with LD (n=18). Phase 1 targeted student outcomes from the four groups from the first year of IESPP implementation. Independent t tests of group means compared the progress between the four groups on three measures of reading fluency: Oral Reading, Retell, and Word Usage.All groups evidenced gains. Students without LD were found to have made statistically significant gains in Oral Reading Fluency compared with students with LD. No significant differences were found between students with and without LD. English as a second language did not appear to impact relative performance.In Phase 2, principals, reading coaches, and the reading coordinator participated in semi-structured interviews identifying the elements contributing to successful implementation of IESPP. Elements included: (a) site leadership and external training support, (b) teacher commitment and cooperation, and (c) common terminology in reading instruction.Challenges identified in schools implementing the IESPP included: (a) structuring changes involving lessons, coordination with other teachers, and philosophic differences in instruction, (b) training in progress monitoring and data interpretation, (c) identifying gaps in students' cultural literacy, and (d) acquiring additional time and personnel for intervention.Primary implications included the need for: (a) involving key site leaders,(b) providing resources and IESPP supports to sites based on identified student weaknesses, (c) anticipating teacher reactions while addressing change, and(d) continuing research of the IESPP model's impact on English language learners and students with LD.Further implications and recommendations for districts, site leaders and reading coaches implementing IESPP are included.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Special Education
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Chalfant, James C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA Comparison of the Reading Progress of English Language Speakers and Learners, Participating in an Intensive, Explicit, Structured, Phonics-based Programen_US
dc.creatorMcCain, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCain, Kathleenen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA large body of research supports the use of intensive, explicit, structured, phonics-based programming (IESPP) for achieving positive outcomes for students at-risk for reading failure. Few studies included English language learners. The purpose of this study was to determine whether students participating in IESPP became proficient readers and to identify site characteristics contributing to successful implementation.The sample consisted of 199 third grade students from three schools in a district in the Southwest using IESPP. Participants were assigned to one of four groups: English speakers (n=89), English learners (n=79), English speakers with learning disabilities (LD) (n=13), and English learners with LD (n=18). Phase 1 targeted student outcomes from the four groups from the first year of IESPP implementation. Independent t tests of group means compared the progress between the four groups on three measures of reading fluency: Oral Reading, Retell, and Word Usage.All groups evidenced gains. Students without LD were found to have made statistically significant gains in Oral Reading Fluency compared with students with LD. No significant differences were found between students with and without LD. English as a second language did not appear to impact relative performance.In Phase 2, principals, reading coaches, and the reading coordinator participated in semi-structured interviews identifying the elements contributing to successful implementation of IESPP. Elements included: (a) site leadership and external training support, (b) teacher commitment and cooperation, and (c) common terminology in reading instruction.Challenges identified in schools implementing the IESPP included: (a) structuring changes involving lessons, coordination with other teachers, and philosophic differences in instruction, (b) training in progress monitoring and data interpretation, (c) identifying gaps in students' cultural literacy, and (d) acquiring additional time and personnel for intervention.Primary implications included the need for: (a) involving key site leaders,(b) providing resources and IESPP supports to sites based on identified student weaknesses, (c) anticipating teacher reactions while addressing change, and(d) continuing research of the IESPP model's impact on English language learners and students with LD.Further implications and recommendations for districts, site leaders and reading coaches implementing IESPP are included.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSpecial Educationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairChalfant, James C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAntia, Shirin D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPysh, Margaret V.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSabers, Darrell L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2635en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749623en_US
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