Competing Material Culture: Philistine Settlement at Tel Miqne-Ekron in the Early Iron Age

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193997
Title:
Competing Material Culture: Philistine Settlement at Tel Miqne-Ekron in the Early Iron Age
Author:
Mazow, Laura Beth
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation explores the changing role of material culture in the expression of identity, using the Philistine settlement at Tel Miqne-Ekron in the Iron I (12th-10th centuries BCE) as a test case. A diachronic analysis documenting strategies of maintenance and adaptation points to the transformation of materials from domestic tools to symbols of social status, which were used to define social boundaries and promote a distinct identity. This occurred in conjunction with the increasing strength of the Philistine presence in the southern Levant.My dissertation focuses on one excavation area, described as the 'elite' zone. I outlined two areas of investigation: the organization of space, and a spatial distribution of the artifact assemblage. Through this analysis, I reconstruct Buildings 351 and 350 as elite residences, and Buildings 353 and 354 as the loci of crafts activities. Furthermore, I suggest that activities associated with Buildings 351 and 350 included elite sponsored feasting, and argue that the interconnected construction of these buildings with Buildings 353 and 354 implies an integrated function.In the final part of my analysis, I interpret change over time by contextualizing the foreign, i.e. Philistine and local, i.e. Canaanite material culture assemblages as a means to investigate diachronic variation. My research demonstrates that the traditional focus on foreign origins has obscured our understanding of these objects by removing them from their local contexts. Developments included a shift in the role played by the Philistine pottery, from a domestic assemblage associated with an immigrant populations' adjustment of traditional methods of daily practices, to a fine-ware assemblage, where it was used to express a concept of elite identity. The model I propose views change as a reflexive process involving both group and individual interactions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Near Eastern Archaeology; Iron Age; Ceramics; Identity; Feasting; Philistines
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Near Eastern Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wright, J. Edward; Dever, William G.
Committee Chair:
Wright, J. Edward; Dever, William G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleCompeting Material Culture: Philistine Settlement at Tel Miqne-Ekron in the Early Iron Ageen_US
dc.creatorMazow, Laura Bethen_US
dc.contributor.authorMazow, Laura Bethen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores the changing role of material culture in the expression of identity, using the Philistine settlement at Tel Miqne-Ekron in the Iron I (12th-10th centuries BCE) as a test case. A diachronic analysis documenting strategies of maintenance and adaptation points to the transformation of materials from domestic tools to symbols of social status, which were used to define social boundaries and promote a distinct identity. This occurred in conjunction with the increasing strength of the Philistine presence in the southern Levant.My dissertation focuses on one excavation area, described as the 'elite' zone. I outlined two areas of investigation: the organization of space, and a spatial distribution of the artifact assemblage. Through this analysis, I reconstruct Buildings 351 and 350 as elite residences, and Buildings 353 and 354 as the loci of crafts activities. Furthermore, I suggest that activities associated with Buildings 351 and 350 included elite sponsored feasting, and argue that the interconnected construction of these buildings with Buildings 353 and 354 implies an integrated function.In the final part of my analysis, I interpret change over time by contextualizing the foreign, i.e. Philistine and local, i.e. Canaanite material culture assemblages as a means to investigate diachronic variation. My research demonstrates that the traditional focus on foreign origins has obscured our understanding of these objects by removing them from their local contexts. Developments included a shift in the role played by the Philistine pottery, from a domestic assemblage associated with an immigrant populations' adjustment of traditional methods of daily practices, to a fine-ware assemblage, where it was used to express a concept of elite identity. The model I propose views change as a reflexive process involving both group and individual interactions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectNear Eastern Archaeologyen_US
dc.subjectIron Ageen_US
dc.subjectCeramicsen_US
dc.subjectIdentityen_US
dc.subjectFeastingen_US
dc.subjectPhilistinesen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWright, J. Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.advisorDever, William G.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWright, J. Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.chairDever, William G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNakhai, Beth Alperten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMills, Barbara J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristopherson, Gary L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1136en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354149en_US
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