Music From the Soul of Woman: The Influence of the African American Presbyterian and Methodist Traditions on the Classical Compositions of Florence Price and Dorothy Rudd Moore

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193978
Title:
Music From the Soul of Woman: The Influence of the African American Presbyterian and Methodist Traditions on the Classical Compositions of Florence Price and Dorothy Rudd Moore
Author:
Mashego, Shana Thomas
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Since its inception, the African American Church has played a vital role in the African American community. During the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the black Methodist movement began. Methodism was the first separate denomination formed by African Americans in the United States and remains one of the largest denominations populated by African Americans. Presbyterianism became a part of African American culture during the mid nineteenth century. Within many black Methodist and Presbyterian churches, the tradition of the musical liturgy, which included the music of European classical composers, was expected to remain unchanged, and even today many of the churches within these denominations have held fast to a traditional music liturgy.For many black women coming of age during the late eighteenth through to the twentieth centuries, the time of the composers Florence Price (1887-1953) and Dorothy Rudd Moore (b.1940), the music liturgy of the African American Presbyterian and Methodist church aided them in their exposure to European classical composers and their compositions. This document explores the premise that exposure during their formative years to European classical music within their Presbyterian and Methodist churches helped to nurture Price and Moore's approaches to classical music composition. Included in Appendix A and B are works lists of Florence B. Price and Dorothy Rudd Moore. These works lists were organized by the author from various sources and should prove helpful to those interested in the research and performance of the composers' works.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Dorothy Rudd Moore; Florence Price
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Robinson, Faye
Committee Chair:
Robinson, Faye

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMusic From the Soul of Woman: The Influence of the African American Presbyterian and Methodist Traditions on the Classical Compositions of Florence Price and Dorothy Rudd Mooreen_US
dc.creatorMashego, Shana Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorMashego, Shana Thomasen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSince its inception, the African American Church has played a vital role in the African American community. During the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the black Methodist movement began. Methodism was the first separate denomination formed by African Americans in the United States and remains one of the largest denominations populated by African Americans. Presbyterianism became a part of African American culture during the mid nineteenth century. Within many black Methodist and Presbyterian churches, the tradition of the musical liturgy, which included the music of European classical composers, was expected to remain unchanged, and even today many of the churches within these denominations have held fast to a traditional music liturgy.For many black women coming of age during the late eighteenth through to the twentieth centuries, the time of the composers Florence Price (1887-1953) and Dorothy Rudd Moore (b.1940), the music liturgy of the African American Presbyterian and Methodist church aided them in their exposure to European classical composers and their compositions. This document explores the premise that exposure during their formative years to European classical music within their Presbyterian and Methodist churches helped to nurture Price and Moore's approaches to classical music composition. Included in Appendix A and B are works lists of Florence B. Price and Dorothy Rudd Moore. These works lists were organized by the author from various sources and should prove helpful to those interested in the research and performance of the composers' works.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDorothy Rudd Mooreen_US
dc.subjectFlorence Priceen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRobinson, Fayeen_US
dc.contributor.chairRobinson, Fayeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHirst, Graysonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDauphinais, Kristinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11355en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261217en_US
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