CAN TEXT-RELEVANT MOTOR ACTIVITY IMPROVE THE RECALL OF NATIVE AMERICAN CHILDREN? TESTING PREDICTIONS DERIVED FROM GLENBERG'S "INDEXICAL HYPOTHESIS"

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193957
Title:
CAN TEXT-RELEVANT MOTOR ACTIVITY IMPROVE THE RECALL OF NATIVE AMERICAN CHILDREN? TESTING PREDICTIONS DERIVED FROM GLENBERG'S "INDEXICAL HYPOTHESIS"
Author:
Marley, Scott C.
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study extends previous research on motoric activity and imagery production to the text processing of Native American learning-disabled students and third-grade regular-education students. Two experiments were developed to test predictions derived from Glenberg's (1997) "indexical hypothesis". Experiment 1 was performed with learning-disabled Native American students listening to narrative passages under one of three randomly assigned listening strategies: free-study, visual, and manipulate. Experiment 2 was performed with regular-education Native American third graders reading similar passages under one of three randomly assigned reading strategies: reread, observed manipulation, and manipulation. With the learning-disabled students, statistically significant improvements in memory for story events, locations, objects, and actions were observed on cued- and free-recall outcomes when toys representing story characters and settings were present during encoding. Facilitative strategy transfer was not apparent when the toys were removed. With the third-grade students, similar benefits were found when the toys were present. In addition, students who had access to the toys during a training period performed significantly better on cued- and free-recall measures relative to reread students when the toys were no longer present.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
indexical motoric affordances; disabled reading
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Levin, Joel R.
Committee Chair:
Levin, Joel R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleCAN TEXT-RELEVANT MOTOR ACTIVITY IMPROVE THE RECALL OF NATIVE AMERICAN CHILDREN? TESTING PREDICTIONS DERIVED FROM GLENBERG'S "INDEXICAL HYPOTHESIS"en_US
dc.creatorMarley, Scott C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMarley, Scott C.en_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study extends previous research on motoric activity and imagery production to the text processing of Native American learning-disabled students and third-grade regular-education students. Two experiments were developed to test predictions derived from Glenberg's (1997) "indexical hypothesis". Experiment 1 was performed with learning-disabled Native American students listening to narrative passages under one of three randomly assigned listening strategies: free-study, visual, and manipulate. Experiment 2 was performed with regular-education Native American third graders reading similar passages under one of three randomly assigned reading strategies: reread, observed manipulation, and manipulation. With the learning-disabled students, statistically significant improvements in memory for story events, locations, objects, and actions were observed on cued- and free-recall outcomes when toys representing story characters and settings were present during encoding. Facilitative strategy transfer was not apparent when the toys were removed. With the third-grade students, similar benefits were found when the toys were present. In addition, students who had access to the toys during a training period performed significantly better on cued- and free-recall measures relative to reread students when the toys were no longer present.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectindexical motoric affordancesen_US
dc.subjectdisabled readingen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLevin, Joel R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairLevin, Joel R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberD'Agostino Jerryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlisky, Elizabethen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1183en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747456en_US
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