Making Something Out of Next to Nothing: Bartolomeo Cavaceppi and the Major Restorations of Myron's Discobolus

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193942
Title:
Making Something Out of Next to Nothing: Bartolomeo Cavaceppi and the Major Restorations of Myron's Discobolus
Author:
Barr, Sandra M
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Unbeknownst to the public and many scholars, the vast majority of ancient sculptural works - which are displayed in museums and cited in many textbooks as original and canonical pieces - are actually extensively restored eighteenth-century variations. Although during that time period extensive, and often creative, restoration was a well accepted practice, this does call into question the authenticity of these pieces and their usefulness as paradigms of ancient art.This is especially true for one of the most iconic and well known of ancient sculptural works - the Discobolus. The original bronze statue of a young nude discus thrower was created in the mid-fifth century BC by the Greek artist Myron. The original sculpture no longer exists. The extant works are all restorations of Roman marble copies with linkage to an extremely prolific eighteenth-century Italian sculptor and restorer, Bartolomeo Cavaceppi.This dissertation explores the work and practice of Cavaceppi during the early period of Neoclassicism, with special emphasis on the restoration of five different variants of the Discobolus. It begins with an examination of the original Greek statue and why so many Roman copies were made. The main focus, however, is on the variations that were introduced when the Roman pieces were restored between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, most notably those connected to the workshop of Cavaceppi. Using the Discobolus as a case study, my intention is to clarify the nature of these restored ancient pieces.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cavaceppi; Discobolus
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
History & Theory of Art; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Plax, Julie A
Committee Chair:
Plax, Julie A

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleMaking Something Out of Next to Nothing: Bartolomeo Cavaceppi and the Major Restorations of Myron's Discobolusen_US
dc.creatorBarr, Sandra Men_US
dc.contributor.authorBarr, Sandra Men_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUnbeknownst to the public and many scholars, the vast majority of ancient sculptural works - which are displayed in museums and cited in many textbooks as original and canonical pieces - are actually extensively restored eighteenth-century variations. Although during that time period extensive, and often creative, restoration was a well accepted practice, this does call into question the authenticity of these pieces and their usefulness as paradigms of ancient art.This is especially true for one of the most iconic and well known of ancient sculptural works - the Discobolus. The original bronze statue of a young nude discus thrower was created in the mid-fifth century BC by the Greek artist Myron. The original sculpture no longer exists. The extant works are all restorations of Roman marble copies with linkage to an extremely prolific eighteenth-century Italian sculptor and restorer, Bartolomeo Cavaceppi.This dissertation explores the work and practice of Cavaceppi during the early period of Neoclassicism, with special emphasis on the restoration of five different variants of the Discobolus. It begins with an examination of the original Greek statue and why so many Roman copies were made. The main focus, however, is on the variations that were introduced when the Roman pieces were restored between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, most notably those connected to the workshop of Cavaceppi. Using the Discobolus as a case study, my intention is to clarify the nature of these restored ancient pieces.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCavaceppien_US
dc.subjectDiscobolusen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory & Theory of Arten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPlax, Julie Aen_US
dc.contributor.chairPlax, Julie Aen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSoren, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUmberger, Emilyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMartin, Thereseen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVoyatzis, Maryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2645en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749643en_US
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