Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193924
Title:
Development and Testing of the Workplace Climate Questionnaire
Author:
Mahmood, Maysaa H.
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The goal of this research was to develop and test a self-completed questionnaire for use in the routine assessment of work-related stress in a high-technology industrial organization. The initial phase of the study involved reviewing the existing literature to identify items and scales developed to assess workplace stress and strain. The initial item pool contained 92 items divided into 11 domains. Through a process of content validation using focus group discussions, the item pool was reduced to a 38-item questionnaire covering eight domains: demands, control, support, role, relationships, rewards, change, and communications. These 38 items, along with other items included to enable psychometric testing, were converted to a web-based questionnaire. The entire workforce of the organization was invited to complete this questionnaire as part of the pilot study phase.Data from the pilot study were used to test scaling assumptions, evaluate the factor structure, estimate internal consistency reliability, and examine criterion and construct validity of the 38-item Workplace Climate Questionnaire. The distribution of responses to questionnaire items tended to be skewed, with more respondents scoring among the more positive categories. With the exception of the role and relationships scales, no substantial floor and ceiling effects were seen for all the other scales. Each of the 38-item Workplace Climate Questionnaire scales exhibited satisfactory internal-consistency reliability estimates. Items within the demands, control, support, and role scales loaded on the hypothesized scales, while items within the relationships, change, and rewards failed to load on the hypothesized scales.The pilot study provided support for criterion validity of the 38-item Workplace Climate Questionnaire. As hypothesized, individual scales in the questionnaire correlated positively with similar constructs in existing occupational stress instruments. The pilot study also provided support for construct validity of the questionnaire. The demands, control, support, relationships, rewards, and change scales predicted the risk of poor self-reported mental health.Revisions to the 38-item questionnaire resulted in the 22-item Workplace Climate Questionnaire covering the following six domains: demands, control, role, rewards, support, and relationships. The 22-item questionnaire reduces respondent burden and retains satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of factor structure, reliability, criterion validity, and construct validity.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Occupational; Psychometric; Questionnaire; Strain; Stress
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Pharmaceutical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Coons, Stephen Joel
Committee Chair:
Coons, Stephen Joel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDevelopment and Testing of the Workplace Climate Questionnaireen_US
dc.creatorMahmood, Maysaa H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMahmood, Maysaa H.en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this research was to develop and test a self-completed questionnaire for use in the routine assessment of work-related stress in a high-technology industrial organization. The initial phase of the study involved reviewing the existing literature to identify items and scales developed to assess workplace stress and strain. The initial item pool contained 92 items divided into 11 domains. Through a process of content validation using focus group discussions, the item pool was reduced to a 38-item questionnaire covering eight domains: demands, control, support, role, relationships, rewards, change, and communications. These 38 items, along with other items included to enable psychometric testing, were converted to a web-based questionnaire. The entire workforce of the organization was invited to complete this questionnaire as part of the pilot study phase.Data from the pilot study were used to test scaling assumptions, evaluate the factor structure, estimate internal consistency reliability, and examine criterion and construct validity of the 38-item Workplace Climate Questionnaire. The distribution of responses to questionnaire items tended to be skewed, with more respondents scoring among the more positive categories. With the exception of the role and relationships scales, no substantial floor and ceiling effects were seen for all the other scales. Each of the 38-item Workplace Climate Questionnaire scales exhibited satisfactory internal-consistency reliability estimates. Items within the demands, control, support, and role scales loaded on the hypothesized scales, while items within the relationships, change, and rewards failed to load on the hypothesized scales.The pilot study provided support for criterion validity of the 38-item Workplace Climate Questionnaire. As hypothesized, individual scales in the questionnaire correlated positively with similar constructs in existing occupational stress instruments. The pilot study also provided support for construct validity of the questionnaire. The demands, control, support, relationships, rewards, and change scales predicted the risk of poor self-reported mental health.Revisions to the 38-item questionnaire resulted in the 22-item Workplace Climate Questionnaire covering the following six domains: demands, control, role, rewards, support, and relationships. The 22-item questionnaire reduces respondent burden and retains satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of factor structure, reliability, criterion validity, and construct validity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectOccupationalen_US
dc.subjectPsychometricen_US
dc.subjectQuestionnaireen_US
dc.subjectStrainen_US
dc.subjectStressen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmaceutical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCoons, Stephen Joelen_US
dc.contributor.chairCoons, Stephen Joelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlack, Marion K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchlager, Edella C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10561en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752298en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.