Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193907
Title:
Novel Biomedical Imaging Systems
Author:
Luo, Yuan
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The overall purpose of the dissertation is to design and develop novel optical imaging systems that require minimal or no mechanical scanning to reduce the acquisition time for extracting image data from biological tissue samples. Two imaging modalities have been focused upon: a parallel optical coherence tomography (POCT) system and a volume holographic imaging system (VHIS). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a coherent imaging technique, which shows great promise in biomedical applications. A POCT system is a novel technology that replaces mechanically transverse scanning in the lateral direction with electronic scanning. This will reduce the time required to acquire image data. In this system an array with multiple reduced diameter (15μm) single mode fibers (SMFs) is required to obtain an image in the transverse direction. Each fiber in the array is configured in an interferometer and is used to image one pixel in the transverse direction. A VHIS is based on volume holographic gratings acting as Bragg filters in conjunction with conventional optical imaging components to form a spatial-spectral imaging system. The high angular selectivity of the VHIS can be used to obtain two-dimensional image information from objects without the need for mechanical scanning. In addition, the high wavelength selectivity of the VHIS can provide spectral information of a specific area of the object that is being observed. Multiple sections of the object are projected using multiplexed holographic gratings in the same volume of the Phenanthrenquinone- (PQ-) doped Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) recording material.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Optical Sciences
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kostuk, Raymond K.
Committee Chair:
Kostuk, Raymond K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleNovel Biomedical Imaging Systemsen_US
dc.creatorLuo, Yuanen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Yuanen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe overall purpose of the dissertation is to design and develop novel optical imaging systems that require minimal or no mechanical scanning to reduce the acquisition time for extracting image data from biological tissue samples. Two imaging modalities have been focused upon: a parallel optical coherence tomography (POCT) system and a volume holographic imaging system (VHIS). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a coherent imaging technique, which shows great promise in biomedical applications. A POCT system is a novel technology that replaces mechanically transverse scanning in the lateral direction with electronic scanning. This will reduce the time required to acquire image data. In this system an array with multiple reduced diameter (15μm) single mode fibers (SMFs) is required to obtain an image in the transverse direction. Each fiber in the array is configured in an interferometer and is used to image one pixel in the transverse direction. A VHIS is based on volume holographic gratings acting as Bragg filters in conjunction with conventional optical imaging components to form a spatial-spectral imaging system. The high angular selectivity of the VHIS can be used to obtain two-dimensional image information from objects without the need for mechanical scanning. In addition, the high wavelength selectivity of the VHIS can provide spectral information of a specific area of the object that is being observed. Multiple sections of the object are projected using multiplexed holographic gratings in the same volume of the Phenanthrenquinone- (PQ-) doped Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) recording material.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKostuk, Raymond K.en_US
dc.contributor.chairKostuk, Raymond K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarton, Jennifer K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGemitro, Arthuren_US
dc.identifier.proquest2848en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749916en_US
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