Epidemiology of Occupational Injuries in a Large Manufacturing Employer, 2002-2006

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193901
Title:
Epidemiology of Occupational Injuries in a Large Manufacturing Employer, 2002-2006
Author:
Lukes, Eileen Nosko
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Approximately 4.2 million workers were injured in the United States in 2005, costing employers over $171 billion, a figure under-estimating the true cost. This retrospective descriptive occupational injury study analyzed existing health and safety data from 2002 through 2006 at a large US manufacturing employer. All work-related injuries from six geographic locations were included in the study. A total of 36,611 injuries involving 20,738 employees were analyzed using descriptive statistics to characterize the injuries, and general estimating equations (GEE) and multivariate logistic regression analyses to identify risk factors affecting the severity of occupational injuries.Nearly two-thirds of injuries reported were recorded on the OSHA log. Forty percent of occupational injuries resulted in restricted days, and 21% resulted in lost days. Three-quarters of the occupational injuries occurred among Production and Maintenance employees. Various injury characteristics and personal/work characteristics influenced recordability of occupational injury, restricted activity and lost days following occupational injury. Repetitive motion and over-exertion injuries were most commonly associated with recordable injuries and injuries with restricted or lost days. Employees with injuries due to repetitive motion in shop operations were more than twice as likely to experience lost days following injury as workers with most other types of injuries. Men were six times as likely to sustain a repetitive motion injury in shop operations. Union affiliation increased the likelihood of having an injury being recorded on the OSHA log or incurring restricted or lost days; however, significant interaction terms that included union status and other variables, suggest that the results should be viewed cautiously. Production & Maintenance workers were at greatest risk for incurring multiple injuries.Results of this study can be used to enhance prevention programs already in place in this company. Targeting future repetitive motion and over-exertion injuries and ensuring proper treatment and prevention interventions may reduce the severity and recurrence of injuries.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
occupational injury; epidemiology
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Epidemiology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
O'Rourke, Mary Kay

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleEpidemiology of Occupational Injuries in a Large Manufacturing Employer, 2002-2006en_US
dc.creatorLukes, Eileen Noskoen_US
dc.contributor.authorLukes, Eileen Noskoen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractApproximately 4.2 million workers were injured in the United States in 2005, costing employers over $171 billion, a figure under-estimating the true cost. This retrospective descriptive occupational injury study analyzed existing health and safety data from 2002 through 2006 at a large US manufacturing employer. All work-related injuries from six geographic locations were included in the study. A total of 36,611 injuries involving 20,738 employees were analyzed using descriptive statistics to characterize the injuries, and general estimating equations (GEE) and multivariate logistic regression analyses to identify risk factors affecting the severity of occupational injuries.Nearly two-thirds of injuries reported were recorded on the OSHA log. Forty percent of occupational injuries resulted in restricted days, and 21% resulted in lost days. Three-quarters of the occupational injuries occurred among Production and Maintenance employees. Various injury characteristics and personal/work characteristics influenced recordability of occupational injury, restricted activity and lost days following occupational injury. Repetitive motion and over-exertion injuries were most commonly associated with recordable injuries and injuries with restricted or lost days. Employees with injuries due to repetitive motion in shop operations were more than twice as likely to experience lost days following injury as workers with most other types of injuries. Men were six times as likely to sustain a repetitive motion injury in shop operations. Union affiliation increased the likelihood of having an injury being recorded on the OSHA log or incurring restricted or lost days; however, significant interaction terms that included union status and other variables, suggest that the results should be viewed cautiously. Production & Maintenance workers were at greatest risk for incurring multiple injuries.Results of this study can be used to enhance prevention programs already in place in this company. Targeting future repetitive motion and over-exertion injuries and ensuring proper treatment and prevention interventions may reduce the severity and recurrence of injuries.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectoccupational injuryen_US
dc.subjectepidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEpidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairO'Rourke, Mary Kayen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberO'Rourke, Mary Kayen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurgess, Jeffen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoe, Deniseen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMohler, Janeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2851en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749917en_US
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