Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193898
Title:
Muddy Waters: Case Studies in Dry Land Water Resource Economics
Author:
Bark, Rosalind Heather
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Arizona like many other semi-arid regions in the world is facing a suite of policy issues that stem from water scarcity and security of supply issues intersecting with growing and competing water demands. A vexing issue in southern Arizona has been the preservation of riparian habitat. The study of environmental economics provides researchers with techniques to estimate the value of natural resources, such as riparian habitat, to level the playing field in policy discussions on development and water management. In Appendices B-D results from two hedonic property analyses suggest that homebuyers, one of the main consumers of riparian habitat in urban areas, have preferences for greener and higher condition riparian habitat and furthermore that they are willing to pay property premiums to benefit from this resource. There is also some evidence that riparian habitat conservation and restoration can be self-financing. The economics of another water using sector in the state, the recreation sector, specifically winter-based recreation, is assessed in Appendix E. The analysis finds that although ski areas in Arizona are subject to large inter-year variability in terms of snowfall and season length that snowmaking adaptations, a technology that is water-intensive, is financially feasible in the medium term as a climate variability and climate change adaptation. Nevertheless, ski areas in the state are likely to face increased financial pressures if climate change scenarios are realized and will have to implement other adaptation strategies to remain viable. Finally, water competition in the state between Indian and non-Indian users and the techniques used to dispel such tensions, namely water settlements, are discussed in Appendix F. The research finds that settlements offer opportunities for win-win agreements between the settling tribe and other water users in the same watersheds and for the introduction of new water supply management tools that benefit signatory and non-signatory parties alike.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
water resource economics; GIS; climate change
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Arid Lands Resource Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Colby, Bonnie G.
Committee Chair:
Colby, Bonnie G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMuddy Waters: Case Studies in Dry Land Water Resource Economicsen_US
dc.creatorBark, Rosalind Heatheren_US
dc.contributor.authorBark, Rosalind Heatheren_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractArizona like many other semi-arid regions in the world is facing a suite of policy issues that stem from water scarcity and security of supply issues intersecting with growing and competing water demands. A vexing issue in southern Arizona has been the preservation of riparian habitat. The study of environmental economics provides researchers with techniques to estimate the value of natural resources, such as riparian habitat, to level the playing field in policy discussions on development and water management. In Appendices B-D results from two hedonic property analyses suggest that homebuyers, one of the main consumers of riparian habitat in urban areas, have preferences for greener and higher condition riparian habitat and furthermore that they are willing to pay property premiums to benefit from this resource. There is also some evidence that riparian habitat conservation and restoration can be self-financing. The economics of another water using sector in the state, the recreation sector, specifically winter-based recreation, is assessed in Appendix E. The analysis finds that although ski areas in Arizona are subject to large inter-year variability in terms of snowfall and season length that snowmaking adaptations, a technology that is water-intensive, is financially feasible in the medium term as a climate variability and climate change adaptation. Nevertheless, ski areas in the state are likely to face increased financial pressures if climate change scenarios are realized and will have to implement other adaptation strategies to remain viable. Finally, water competition in the state between Indian and non-Indian users and the techniques used to dispel such tensions, namely water settlements, are discussed in Appendix F. The research finds that settlements offer opportunities for win-win agreements between the settling tribe and other water users in the same watersheds and for the introduction of new water supply management tools that benefit signatory and non-signatory parties alike.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectwater resource economicsen_US
dc.subjectGISen_US
dc.subjectclimate changeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArid Lands Resource Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorColby, Bonnie G.en_US
dc.contributor.chairColby, Bonnie G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarsh, Stuarten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAradhyula, Satheesh V.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1908en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746474en_US
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